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  1. #11
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyleB View Post
    That's what I was thinking, a "staged" photo.
    I was a stringer for a guy who did convention photography.We used to have to set up groups for shooting with 12/20 banquet cameras and Cirkut Cameras. No megaphone, though.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  2. #12

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    cameras that took 4x5 plates ( dry plates )
    were around in the 1880s / 1890s easy ...
    i have a few of them. they have "instantaneous" shutter speeds
    that would have been anywhere between 1/15-1/60th S...
    no megaphone would be needed ...

  3. #13

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    i have shot wet plate collodion in direct sun in NY for 1 sec. at f16. most of the lenses at that time were f3- f8. being the photo is from 1887 or so they were probably using dry plates which were WAY faster than collodion. it would have been very easy to produce the photo....with or without a mega phone.
    photoshop is somewhere you go to buy photo equipment.


    lens photos here

  4. #14
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I looked at the images on the page http://www.wickheritage.org/johnston...y.asp?catid=55 and indeed there is a picture of the Wick Harbour c1862, however, the rest of the images look to be from much later in time. Based on the type of steam ships I'd say many of the other images are from 1900 to 1920s.

    From about 1905 onwards sailing Fifies were gradually fitted with engines and converted to motorised vessels.--wiki

  5. #15
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    Thanks everyone for your responses. I'll be passing on this info to the people at the Heritage Centre. It's amazing to find out how quickly the technology developed, and how quickly the new techniques were readily adopted by photographers of the time.
    Truly fascinating.

  6. #16
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    There is also the 1/125 Galli shutter, or similar that could have been used with appropriate light and plate. Photographers are an improvisational lot.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    There is also the 1/125 Galli shutter, or similar that could have been used with appropriate light and plate. Photographers are an improvisational lot.
    I found Jim's "shutter" innovation searching for something last year, and it is indeed quite possible to get higher shutter speeds than I can manage with a Packard. And it's actually pretty repeatable after you do it a few times.

    (Unless you drop the darkslides!)
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Graflex and Graphic focal plane shutters from the 1900's could shoot at 1/1000 seconds. Some focal plane shutters were even faster then. See:
    The Evolution and Demise of the Larger Format Press Cameras by Reg Holoway
    The All-american Cameras a review of GRAFLEX by Richard P. Paine

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    I'm sure it's a dryplate, with an early shutter, like people are saying above. Prosch invented a popular shutter around 1886, and before that there were "drop" shutters. The dryplate era really made photography easy and popular with amateurs.

    http://www.photica.net/shutters/shutters.htm

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