Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,553   Posts: 1,544,957   Online: 780
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: Glass negs

  1. #11
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,295
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael W View Post
    Agfa Gevaert still make APX 100 plates. However they are not cheap, I think it's over $100 for a box of 10 or 12.
    APX 100 Glass Plates, 10 plates, 65x90 mm / 2.5x3.5 inches, 1.5-1.7 mm thick
    126.20 (EUR) / 169.01 (USD)

    240x240 mm / 9.45x9.54 inches, apparently also available by request only (no price given)

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  2. #12
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    ouch!

  3. #13
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,295
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by dwross View Post
    ouch!
    Agreed...

    but...

    they are still manufactured and available...

    (although probably nowhere near as much fun as making your own...)



    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #14
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,859
    Images
    9
    I agree on the price being a big ouch, but it would be nice to use something like APX 100 glass plates, souping in Rodinal. But then again, I am a certified nerd.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,272
    Images
    148
    If you get a chance to see how Ilfords plate coating line works you'd understand why it's expensive and I'd guess the Belgian facility's not far different.

    Production volumes are so low these are small lines, in Ilford's case taking up the same sort of floor space as their test/pilot coating line which is used for test coatings of film and paper and also things like filters. All emulsions are test coated and checked before final coating on the main coating line. A short glass plate run is relatively labour intensive needing two people one loading the plates the other almost catching at the end of the line. However when glass plates were the norm different coating lines were in use and plates were cut to size after coating in many cases.

    Commercial plates are now used because of their high dimensionable stability, their major use is in nuclear research facilities. It's actually slightly ironic that in fact Governments have propped up and helped many emulsion manufactureers, from Ferrania in Italy, Agfa in Germany etc.

    Ian

  6. #16
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,859
    Images
    9
    Yes, I can see the price point being what it is, because of the limited demand, and being labour intensive.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  7. #17
    Two23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    311
    The problem with DIY dry plates is they have a relatively short shelf life. Would commercially prepared ones stay "fresh" longer? I have a Watson & Son half plate camera and have been interested in learning dry plate.


    Kent in SD

  8. #18
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,272
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    The problem with DIY dry plates is they have a relatively short shelf life. Would commercially prepared ones stay "fresh" longer? I have a Watson & Son half plate camera and have been interested in learning dry plate.


    Kent in SD
    Hi Kent, it must be getting cold in South Denmark

    Do DIY plates have a short shelf life ? How short ? It's an important consideration. I've not made an emulsion since 1986 when I worked in that field commercially but I'm getting itchy feet

    Ian

  9. #19
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    The problem with DIY dry plates is they have a relatively short shelf life.
    Kent in SD
    That's a 'rule' I haven't heard before. Perhaps you mean diy plates made with a Liquid Light-type product (??) It is possible to overcook (digest) an emulsion in the last stage. If you do, the plates can very slowly pick up fog over time. Of course, there's no requirement that you ruin the broth I suppose it also depends on the definition of 'short' shelf life. I deliberately put aside a plate for a year and then exposed it to test. It seemed as good as new.

    d

  10. #20
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Ian,

    I'd give a lot to see you start making emulsions again. Please do!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin