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  1. #41
    Q17
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    I think what really makes me love this photograph is the tension. Tension between the patterns and colors, tension in the leaning of the trellis, tension in the sofa springs that aren't depressed from this woman's weight... And there is the tension between the nonchalant expression on the woman's face and these wild elements surrounding her.

    The photograph excites me, and I could return to it over and over again.

    =michelle=

  2. #42
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    We have to GET PAST the camera-club-criticism that gives images demerits for breaking some 'rule'. Academic art was dead by 1830. Photography HAS to catch up.

    Instead, accept what the photographer did.
    Assume that he knew what he was doing,
    and let the picture work on you.
    I was going to quote Lee until I read this by DF which says it quite plainly. Trying to mash everything into a set of "rules" defined by who knows who just doesn't get it.

    I see Eggleston depicting something very familiar in his life, in his environment. Something that can't be fit into analytical buckets, but fits into the life and ways he is fond of.

    I don't see this as a seminal "great" photograph. But its great in conveying the mood of the life it is depicting. That makes it stand on its own.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    A few points:

    I grew up in the Rockies so any picture I've probably ever seen of mountains with snow on them is ho hum. Maybe the same for people who see pictures of what they consider "every day" stuff.

    To me the picture represents a campy, sort of tacky existance but still with a dignity.

    The crappy old mattress that looks like it came out of a holiday trailer stuck on an old couch/glider. The horrible dress but still the dignity.

    As someone who photographs people, there is always something "growing out of people's heads". It's called the background. It's just that you choose to ignore it in real life, but somehow in a photograph it's "growing out of their head".

    Do I like the picture. Yes probably. It doesn't have a snapshot quality to me because a snap shooter would not have been able to compose the perfect "cross" in the picture.

    So to me, in 2006 it's kind of campy and interesting.


    Michael
    I like it a lot more after the evening's liquid refreshments. Kind of takes the "campy" edge off it...or am I not permitted to say that? Is that considered a camera club critique?

    She must have been a real darling in her day. Notice the cigarette in her hand. All loose women smoked back then. Oh I long for those days...
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  4. #44

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    I agree sometimes you need to just let an image work on you.

    One of my favorite stories about art (if anyone can point out this specific example let us know) is about a banker who spent a ton of money on a modern painting in the 50s. I don't remember if it was a Pollock or Rothko or Kline or any of the other AB Exers or action painters. But what he said was to the effect, I have to spend my whole day working with people and numbers and making decisions and when I come home I have this painting on the wall. I can just sit and look at it and the best part of it is it doesn't mean a damn thing!
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #45
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    I like it a lot more after the evening's liquid refreshments. Kind of takes the "campy" edge off it...or am I not permitted to say that? Is that considered a camera club critique?

    ..... ...
    Works for me !

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    I like it a lot more after the evening's liquid refreshments. Kind of takes the "campy" edge off it...or am I not permitted to say that? Is that considered a camera club critique?

    She must have been a real darling in her day. Notice the cigarette in her hand. All loose women smoked back then. Oh I long for those days...
    From my little experience with camera clubs, they would be much more educational and entertaining if the members were stoned on something before the meeting begins.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  7. #47
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    Why do you think they serve wine at gallery openings.



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #48

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    "A picture must be painted in such a way that the viewer can understand its meaning. If the people who see a picture cannot grasp its meaning, no matter what a talented artist may have painted it, they cannot say it is a good picture."

    shouldn't the same apply to photographs?

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim atherton
    "A picture must be painted in such a way that the viewer can understand its meaning. If the people who see a picture cannot grasp its meaning, no matter what a talented artist may have painted it, they cannot say it is a good picture."

    shouldn't the same apply to photographs?
    I disagree with the quote anyway. Sometimes you can see that something is "good" (whatever that means - do you mean "worthwhile?" - or possibly that the paint's been applied in a competent fashion?) even though you feel you dont quite undertstand it yet. Some paintings, and photographs, reveal more the more you look at them.
    Cate

  10. #50

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    I think Marko got it 100% for me. There's a similar shot in every family's archive which the outsider, if he had to look at it out of politeness, would simply glance at and move on.

    pentaxuser

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