Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,228   Posts: 1,532,699   Online: 773
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,810
    Images
    108
    Thank you Chris, Dominik and George.

    If I understand correctly there is a protector layer for panchromatic emulsion and under these two layers there is another protector layer for starch grains. If we dip everything to alcohol , there is a risk to damage the starch layer when removing top three layers. I wish top protector layer and bottom protector layer have different formulas.
    May be top protector layer could be removed with matchsticks and cotton balls slowly with least alcohol inside.

    May be top layer could also removed slowly with 2000 or more grade sanding paper

  2. #12
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,056
    Only developed plates have a varnished emulsion unused plates don't. If they had the photographer wouldn't have been able to develop the plate.Even used plates were often not varnished. Beneath the emulsion layer you have a varnish layer don't remove it under any circumstances. The pigments that were used are water soluble. The Varnish that protects the starch/color is a mix between Dammar resin, ethyl acetate, nitrocellulose and castor oil.

    Dominik

  3. #13
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,810
    Images
    108
    Thank you Dominik.

    As George reported a alcohol soluble shellac varnish for panchromatic emulsion , you report a alcohol soluble shellac varnish for starch grains. Dipping to the alcohol destroys two of them and make the starch grains unprotected and fragile.

    Lets continiue from here , what is the best way to remove the top of the all , shellac varnish without harming the other ?

    Umut

  4. #14
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,056
    Mustafa the top varnish was optional and in fact not done very often, when you get the plates the first thing you have to do is to check if the emulsion was in fact varnished. Use small amount of stripping solution on a cotton ball and rub it in the emuslsion or top layer don't use a bath.

    Dominik

  5. #15
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,810
    Images
    108
    Dominik ,

    Good advise on not using a bath. My sister is living at Paris and if I buy a plate , she would be the buyer. I think sending her to antique shops and giving time to study the art is only option.

    Is there any online shop which sells unexposed plates ?

    May be this is another thread subject.

    Thank you ,

    Umut

  6. #16
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,810
    Images
    108
    Dominik ,

    You have reported that Autochrome plates have also a protective glass also , totally two glasses and a sandwich.
    How to remove that protective glass ? Is it mobile or adhesived to emulsion shellac resin ?

    Best ,

    Umut

  7. #17
    MDR
    MDR is offline
    MDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,056
    Mustafa the glassplates were glued together with an adhesive tape or paper strip. Simple cut trough the strip that's it.

    Domink

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin