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  1. #11

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    I remember when the green boxes were first hitting the market. Say...1969 or so? (In SE US). The commercials on TV used to tout how the Japanese eyeball was so much more color-responsive than the American eyeball. And went on to use that "fact" to explain Fuji's superior color response and saturation in their brand of film. And the bright green box looked prettier than the boring looking Kodak yellow boxes. And that's the story of Fuji's market entrance in the US market. Oh, and it was cheap, too. (that always helps).

  2. #12
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Who buys green boxes , only the farmers and vegeterians. American eyeball ? , what is american eyeball ? Is there such a race ? If you talk about colors , come and tell to Indians and Chinese people ! They drink tea since BC 2752 , 4765 years !

    Why americans pay such a money to Japan , why dont they apply tariffs ? What is the reason of such a big import ? And We can not sell anything to USA because of tariffs !

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Who buys green boxes , only the farmers and vegeterians. American eyeball ? , what is american eyeball ? Is there such a race ? If you talk about colors , come and tell to Indians and Chinese people ! They drink tea since BC 2752 , 4765 years !

    Why americans pay such a money to Japan , why dont they apply tariffs ? What is the reason of such a big import ? And We can not sell anything to USA because of tariffs !
    I only report what the commercials on TV said. I was only 12, 13, 14 years old maybe. As far as I know, there is no "American race". If so, they were Winston Churchill's words. I drink iced tea, as that's the only way tea is supposed to be. As far as the relationship between the US and Japan, such relationship probably dates back to the aftermath of the war, and reconstruction. The last question is undoubtedly political, which is a subject of much head-scratching and angst.
    At the time of entry of the green boxes in the American market, coincided with the disappearance of the red ones (Ansco), so perhaps there was a void. Kodak was king. (still is, just a smaller kingdom).

  4. #14
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    Kodachrome was Kodak's first reversal color film.

    The cyan coupler was the offending coupler. It had a very narrow band width which meant that the unit neutral was distorted. That led to bright garish colors with a green cast to neutrals.

    PE

  5. #15

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    George Eastman never got to live to see the multilayer all-on-one color film. I suppose he did get to see Technicolor, which was not the same. I wonder if he would have ever imagined film technology getting to where it did.

  6. #16

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    Of course, this entire thread is irrelevant if you happen to be an insect. My good buddies, the mantids, can see well into the U.V. range. I let them be my guides.
    Bill

  7. #17

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    It's the laws of both physics and physiology which constitute RGB into true additive color, and CMY into subtractive. Mixing apples with oranges in this respect (RYB) is just poor education, inherited from kindergarten finger painting classes it seems. After that, it's an extremely complicated problem of finding "ideal" dyes or pigments for particular applications, which of course don't really exist, so things need to be tweaked. For example, the older Ektachrome green reproduction was rather contaminated with magenta. Fuji cleaned up the problem long before Kodak did. But people tend to misinterpret visual reality for what they are photographically accustomed to. Early pigment prints generally used alizaron crimson, chromium oxide green, and cadmium yellow - and other than being rather efficient at poisoning the user,
    was really a very poor set of process colors. Still, people made it work and some wonderful if rather unrealistic prints transpired from time to
    time. Photographic color is never reality, even in the best of circumstances. But back to film - I personally switched over to the "green boxes" because with Fuji sheet film the green was so much easier to tame when printing Cibachrome. Not until Kodak came out with E100G did they have an equivalent product. And sheet Kodachrome was long long gone (though I did print 35mm and 120 Kodachrome, along with
    old-style Agfachromes and numerous other things - each with its own "look").

  8. #18

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    Not sure what Mustafa means by artists using a RYB palette. Whether we talk about additive or subtractive mixing, mixing light is much different than mixing pigment, and the theory cannot be perfectly applied. That's why every artist needs a green paint, for example. Although paint has a variety of issues. Not sure to what extent similar problems exist with the dyes in films. Apples and oranges I guess.

  9. #19

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    Totally off topic, but Wild Bill... Have you ever seen the courtship dance of a mantispid? It's highly elaborate, just like some bird species, but
    in the end the wife ends up eating the husband alive head first, just like praying mantis species do. And for their diminished size, they're even
    more remarkable in the way they can snatch a housefly mid-flight with their forearms.

  10. #20

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    Some wives eat their husbands alive. It's just that in the human species it takes a lot longer, sometimes years. Still it's not a pretty sight.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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