Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,909   Posts: 1,556,175   Online: 1037
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36

Thread: Coating rods

  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,186
    Images
    65
    I suggest a 5 mil to 7 mil gap for paper and a 7 mil to 10 mil gap for film. The one we used at class gave us about 11 mil and the pictures were just fine. Right?

    Nick can give you a source and product #.

    PE

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,677
    The carbon printing forum, hosted by Sandy King, sometimes does group orders for precision stainless coating rods.

  3. #13
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I suggest a 5 mil to 7 mil gap for paper and a 7 mil to 10 mil gap for film. The one we used at class gave us about 11 mil and the pictures were just fine. Right?

    Nick can give you a source and product #.

    PE
    Absolutely. Just as long as folks understand that coating paper does not require expensive, specialized lab equipment, and that there is a lot of tolerance in the specs, I'm content to stop nagging. (For now .)
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  4. #14
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,599
    Images
    28
    In regards to tape... 3M Scotch Magic Tape (810) is 2.46 mils.
    http://www.tedpella.com/technote_htm...14-92%20TN.pdf

    Polyester 850 is 1.9 mils.

  5. #15
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,692
    Images
    40
    Being highly imprecise, I used a pipe with electrical tape wound around each end (same number of turns each side!) for pouring my first carbon tissues. One can afford a bit of sloppiness when one does not add expensive metals into the gelatin! Warming up the pipe (it was plastic) and resisting the temptation to roll the pipe as one draws it across helped. Good luck...and do check out LightFarm!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #16
    dwross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    In regards to tape... 3M Scotch Magic Tape (810) is 2.46 mils.
    http://www.tedpella.com/technote_htm...14-92%20TN.pdf

    Polyester 850 is 1.9 mils.
    Hi Athiril,
    Thanks for looking up the numbers on tape! Scotch Magic is a easy candidate for taping puddle pushers. For some reason I've totally forgotten, I had a couple of rolls of 850 when I started playing with emulsions and I settled into it as my tape of choice.

    One note: 0.9 mil of the 850 is the adhesive. That's one reason I like the stuff so much. I just count each wrap as 1 mil because I assume the adhesive mashes down to nearly nothing. I also have to assume the adhesive on Magic Tape is also about 0.9 mils. But, as said, "stressing the mils" isn't necessary. Vaughn's approach to carbon could be the role model for our work. He's a master of his craft, without resorting to expensive accessories.
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  7. #17
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,692
    Images
    40
    Actually, I push the gelatin around with my fingers now...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  8. #18
    GLSmyth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    29
    Thanks for all of the excellent information. I have to send back the magnetic heating plate I got so it will be a little while longer before I can get going. My thought is that there are a number of areas where being absolutely precise will not have as much effect as other areas (as is always the case) so I will start with creating a gap with the rod.

    Amusing that Vaughn mentioned pushing the gelatin around with his fingers as that is exactly what I did with one of my prints in the workshop. The print actually came out pretty good with one exception - there was an area that was so thick that the fixer was not able to get through, so there's a finger of brown across the top.

    Cheers -

    george

  9. #19
    GLSmyth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I suggest a 5 mil to 7 mil gap for paper and a 7 mil to 10 mil gap for film. The one we used at class gave us about 11 mil and the pictures were just fine. Right?

    PE
    PE -

    Yes, just fine - actually, better than fine.

    Out of curiosity, why thicker for film? I would think that it would be the other way around because the emulsion would sink a bit into the paper, but not so with the film.

    Cheers -

    george

  10. #20
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,692
    Images
    40
    George, my guess is that a film emulsion has to block about twice as much light as does a paper emulsion. A film negative has to block light in only one pass...the silver has to be packed in pretty dense to block light. Film emulsions do the heavy lifting. The silver in a paper emulsion gets to block the light twice -- once thru the emulsion, then again as the light is reflected off the paper base and towards our eyes. That's Vaughn's totally unscientific explanation of the day...LOL!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin