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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Just remember that some of these dyes are not easily gotten and if available will cost about $100 / gram. There are few commercial sites that offer such dyes. Kodak, Fuji, Ilford etc. will not sell them at all. At one time, Kodak listed about 15 of them in their catalog, but no longer.

    One gram will be nearly a good supply for 2 reasons. You use very little dye in one experiment and the dyes have poor shelf life even refrigerated or frozen. This is especially true of infra-red dyes.

    I'll leave it to Ryuji to tell you where to get them.

    PE

  2. #12
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    Ryuji, that's interesting.

    Are there, a)., any sources of that dye, and, b)., and cheaper dyes that can be used?

  3. #13

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    (a) Again, this is not a typical hobbist project. This dye is relatively common because some laser researchers use it, but I don't know of a source that an average hobbist can deal with.

    (b) No, good dyes in small quantity cost upward of $50/g in most cases. Good sensitizing dyes aren't easy or cheap to synthesize, and considering the number of steps and work involved, I'd gladly pay the money, although it's not exactly cheap.

  4. #14
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    Well, considering that you're talking about solutions that are on the order of 0.05%, $100 / gram is actually not that bad.

    Assuming that one were to obtain the dyes, how difficult would the actual re-sensitization be?

  5. #15

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    If what you want is to get decent infrared effect by soaking Pan F Plus or Plus-X or whatever in to the solution, you can get it with a couple of trials, if you already mastered the usual technical matters of infrared photography. (If you are not there yet, get a few rolls of HIE first--It'll save you from disappointment and frustration in the beginning.)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242 View Post
    ...

    Are there, a)., any sources of that dye,...
    As I suggested in my last post, it is worth doing a web search on diethylthiatricarbocyanine. You will find sources, and other information.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #17
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    I've definetely shot enough IR film to have a good handle on what to do, but now that HIE upwards of $10 / roll, this sounds like an interesting idea.

    They dye that was menioned in Helen's post is only $56 / gram at Sigma-Aldrich.

  8. #18
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    Well, that sounds reasonable, but you will need to run several experiements to determine if it works, and you may need a spectrosensitometer to check out the real spectral sensitivity after you do the dying.

    Since we have no concrete source of dye, other than Sigma Aldrich, then that is the only common dye avaialble to us. Thanks Helen. I tried Kodak's current chemistry list and all of their sensitizing dyes formerly listed are no longer available.

    I currently have samples of about 10 dyes which are only for the visible portion of the spectrum and will not help with this problem.

    PE

  9. #19
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    From Mees, for interest:


  10. #20
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    Helen;

    That is good for an approximation only. As it says, this is for a chlorobromide emulsion and all film emulsions that I know of are bromoiodide, therefore the spectrum and reactions will be different.

    These particular dyes may not even work on a bromoiodide or they may form "J" aggregates. We had tables of dyes with emulsions, pH, pAg and etc at EK that could be used to pick and choose.

    PE

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