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  1. #11
    nicolai's Avatar
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    A commenter on my blog found another one through these:

    Photographic printing methods: a practical guide to the professional and amateur worker, William Henry Burbank (1891)

  2. #12

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    Some more interesting items at the Internet Archive.

    An old 1800's book on photo chemistry. This book has a chapter on emulsion and ripening. Available at the following site.

    http://www.archive.org/details/chemi...hoto00meldrich

    An interesting film describing in some detail silver halide crystals:
    http://www.archive.org/details/Alchemis1940
    (there is also part 2 of this movie also available at this site).


    Emulsion.

  3. #13
    nicolai's Avatar
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    Cool, thanks!

  4. #14
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    It may be of interest to note that EK has donated George Eastman's personal notebooks and formulas to the George Eastman House. These can be seen by appointment, at GEH in their library. It would be a rare treat to see these.

    PE

  5. #15

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    Interesting OLD description of how motion picture film is made.

    Interesting OLD description of how motion picture film is made.

    http://www.brianpritchard.com/manufa...picture_fi.htm

    Emulsion.

  6. #16

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    An interesting link. A VERY old 1930ś article about Kodak film making.

    http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2006/...hots-are-born/

    Emulsion

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emulsion View Post
    Some more interesting items at the Internet Archive.
    An interesting film describing in some detail silver halide crystals:
    http://www.archive.org/details/Alchemis1940
    (there is also part 2 of this movie also available at this site).
    Emulsion.
    What a great way to start a rainy Saturday morning! Part II is very interesting.
    Thanks for the link.
    d

  8. #18

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    Ron,


    Would this proprietary information be lost if Kodak goes out of business and closes all of its film making operations?

    Sandy





    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    This is an SPSE publication of over 400 pages, standard textbook size. It contains 19 chapters written by the top experts in their fields from each company. So, this crosses company lines, but nevertheless it is a good tutorial for anyone that can get their hands on it. Of course it contains no confidential or proprietary information.

    That is one limit that will be of importance historically.

    PE

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Ron,


    Would this proprietary information be lost if Kodak goes out of business and closes all of its film making operations?

    Sandy
    Sandy;

    Probably a lot of manufacturing secrets would be lost and a lot of procedural operations would become obscure. For example, the details of a dispersion are published in many places, but I doubt if anyone could make one without weeks of trial and error unless they were taught. Same goes for emulsion making.

    Some material may be turned over to George Eastman House. Some has already been placed in their hands, but the usage of many items is obscure.

    I have to "interpret" Wall and Baker for example, to get any sort of useful information out of them regarding emulsion making, and many chemicals they use are obscure today due to name changes.

    They measure many solutions as being made in "degrees Baume" but no one has a conversion table that I know of. None of my handbooks or texts cover it.

    So, it is going to be tough to make up gelatin to a Kodak internal standard in "RBT" units which are entirely arbitrary.

    Sorry for this long answer, but the bottom line is that they may be lost or may be published. If published, they may be so obscure as to be useless or nearly useless.

    PE

  10. #20

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    A long answer with good information is much better than a short answer that does not answer the question.

    What you say is more or less what I suspected. Much of the proprietary information is in the tradition of the practice and subject to loss with the persons of the practice.

    Also, based on conversations I have had with you and other people involved in emulsion making, and in my own limited work with coatings, there appers to be quite a lot of art that is needed to go along with the science of the practice.

    Sandy


    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Sandy;

    Probably a lot of manufacturing secrets would be lost and a lot of procedural operations would become obscure. For example, the details of a dispersion are published in many places, but I doubt if anyone could make one without weeks of trial and error unless they were taught. Same goes for emulsion making.

    Some material may be turned over to George Eastman House. Some has already been placed in their hands, but the usage of many items is obscure.

    I have to "interpret" Wall and Baker for example, to get any sort of useful information out of them regarding emulsion making, and many chemicals they use are obscure today due to name changes.

    They measure many solutions as being made in "degrees Baume" but no one has a conversion table that I know of. None of my handbooks or texts cover it.

    So, it is going to be tough to make up gelatin to a Kodak internal standard in "RBT" units which are entirely arbitrary.

    Sorry for this long answer, but the bottom line is that they may be lost or may be published. If published, they may be so obscure as to be useless or nearly useless.

    PE

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