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  1. #31

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    One Shot Cameras and Dye Transfer not obsolete!

    Hi Ron - I am regularly using a 5x7" NPC one-shot camera, and using the seps to make Dye Transfer prints. I'm also restoring a very nice Curtis 4x5" one-shot camera. While I have been using a Leica M8 digital camera, I use the one shot as a replacement for large format color film as it is getting difficult to find a place around here to process it. For my money, the combo of large format in-camera seps and a highly tuned dye transfer process doesn't really represent a 'retro' process, I use it because it simply gives the absolutely best color print results possible. Its worth the effort, and will never be obsolete. As a plus, this technology can not be 'taken away' from me, as all of this can be done with modest means, the materials can be made in a fairly unsophisticated lab.

    Regards - Jim Browning



    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Sandy;

    Chromogenic color films will be virtually impossible to recreate if there are none being made. Photos taken with tricolor cameras will work well and color bromoil will be useful in printing as will home-made dye bleach. It is possible to hand coat color dye bleach print materials, but dye bleach films with decent camera speed and with decent properties regarding grain are virtually impossible for technical reasons related to having the dyes present to begin with.

    PE

  2. #32
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    Jim;

    I was hoping you would add to this discussion.

    I would like to add that someday, as I mentioned in another post here, matrix film may be unobtainable except by making and coating using methods you have published. This is a real possibility as the market for everything decreases.

    Jim's flat bed coater makes excellent 30x40 sheets of film and may be one of the few routes to large sheets of film or paper that is coated in small shops. He has published the plans on his web site.

    In fact, I would like to mention that Jim's Matrix emulsion formula will be in my book with Jim's kind permission and for which I thank him here in advance. Thanks Jim!

    PE

  3. #33

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    Are dye transfer materials (matrix film and dyes) available from any commercial sources at the moment? I'd like to give it a shot but the financial and technical requirements of making my own materials are a major barrier to me right now!

  4. #34
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    Go here: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyetransfer/ or Jim Browning's web site for more informaiton.

    PE

  5. #35

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    Large numbers are not needed to 'pass on' information.
    I want to learn.
    What else do you need?

  6. #36

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    Yes, design theory is important too... and some of this may be "hidden" in basic chemistry.

    One thing that keeps reappearing in photographic chemistry is buffers and their use/design/calculation whathave you.

    I for one would like to have course work dealing specifically in working with buffers in photographc materials... course work which would prepare me to design working materials that meet given design goals.

    Such a course could be designed by Kirk, a chemist, or a photographic engineer;
    However, the more real life material used in the examples and exercises, the better...
    as that is what holds our attention.

    How many people would actually use such a program/study guide or article?
    Well, at least one!
    I feel there is a real need for such material... despite there being many introductory lessons in chemistry on the net... because if relevancy is not obvious, dedication and probably, efficiency grows weak.

  7. #37

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    great thread
    John Bowen

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    Such a course could be designed by Kirk, a chemist,
    Ray, about all I know on buffers is "A buffer solution is an aqueous solution consisting of a mixture of a weak acid and its conjugate base or a weak base and its conjugate acid."

    For application in emulsion making, that's about it for me. Oh, citric acid buffers I think are OK, but there's some acids/salts you don't want to use in emulsion making.

    Unless you want a 15 minute class, we'll need someone else to teach it!
    Last edited by Kirk Keyes; 04-06-2009 at 12:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  9. #39
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    Buffer capacity as normally used in photography is used with respect to developers for the most part. It is also important in fix baths and stop baths, but not nearly so as in developers.

    In emulsion making it becomes important when scaling. The smaller kettles have less "buffer capacity" which in this case isn't related to acid-base reactions but to the inertia or resistance to vAg (pAg) change. The bigger the make, the larger the inertia of the bigger kettle.

    PE

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    Ray, about all I know on buffers is ...
    Unless you want a 15 minute class, we'll need someone else to teach it!
    Sorry Kirk.

    In that case, I would have to agree with you.

    One "should" be able to get the level of "expertise" needed from published materials and sources... but I haven't found it possible to get past a certain level.... yet.

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