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  1. #11

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    Hi, What kinds of equipment do the factories use?

    Joe Moo

  2. #12
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    big kinds. I'm curious as to the layers. I thought kodachrome was the simplest of color films? It has the anti curling, blue sensitive, yellow colloidial(w/e) silver filter, green sensitive, red sensitive, base, and remjet. what am I missing? The sensitizing would have to be fairly exact...very exact. I tried the color separation method and couldn't find the color developers so I photoshoped to the finish. It was fun nevertheless...

  3. #13
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjwaffle View Post
    Hi, What kinds of equipment do the factories use?

    Joe Moo
    I can't say about Kodak, but I have done a little work around Fuji coating lines. While it isn't rocket science from an industrial machinery perspective, it is a *LOT* to handle for a small time operator. And I'm a machine kind of guy, not a chemistry kind of guy. I know how to make a machine do what someone tells me it should do, but they have to figure out the process for me. However, the Fuji coating process is not trivial for a mastersheet. I doubt Kodak's is any less intensive.

    My real interest is on the other end, specifically the possibility of using a tri-color separation set of 4x5 sheets and develop them individually in the three Kodachrome developers to create a handmade 4x5 slide.

    I don't think there's any commercial potential for it, there sure could be an art potential.

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #14

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    Michael - you should talk to Wildbillbugman - he's working on making panchro B&W emulsions to put in his tricolor-neg camera to make color transparencies on glass, I believe.

  5. #15
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    Kodachrome layers /OC with UV/Y/IL + yellow dye/Fast Magenta/Magenta/IL/Fast Cyan/Cyan/Support/Rem Jet/

    The fast and slow layers are often combined in slow products but separate in fast films. The machine is huge and a discussion of this is on the Emulsion and Making forum here with photos of a small scale prototyping machine. You may wish to look at that.

    PE

  6. #16
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    Michael - you should talk to Wildbillbugman - he's working on making panchro B&W emulsions to put in his tricolor-neg camera to make color transparencies on glass, I believe.
    I have, in fact, been following the threads. For the moment I'm interested in using commercially available emulsions. I think making my own emulsions is a bit beyond where I want to go for a while.

    I am, however, starting to read material on the Kodachrome developing process to see how one can home grow it. This thread has sparked my curiosity.

    Obviously, dealing with three different physical pieces of film makes a lot of the issues in the KR64 product moot. I.e., there's no backing to worry about removing, you aren't obliged to protect one color layer from the others during processing because they're physically independent, etc. In fact, there isn't any reason you couldn't do the different colors on different days since you've got them physically separate.

    Now, how nasty is the process, and how likely am I to be able to control it properly at a cost I can afford?

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  7. #17
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    The process uses a high pH color developer (~11 - 12) that is not very stable so you might consider it a one-shot. OTOH, the rest of the process is normal. So, if you pick a normal B&W film and process in the normal negative developer, then the rest of the process is a breeze.

    PE

  8. #18
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    lamination is simple
    Won't the film base get in the way? Three emulsions with a few mills of plastic between them would seem to result in a fuzzy result if not looked at dead-on.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #19
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    Laminate 2 of them face to face, and one to the back of the sandwich. That way you get a total plastic laminate.

    In any event, the old timers used it and under normal viewing conditions via projection, didn't seem to complain. OTOH, maybe color was so novel to them they were awed! IDK. Try it!

    PE

  10. #20
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning;

    PE, your messages are always technically refreshing, with a small dose of praticality stirred in for flavor. Thank you.

    Earl Dunbar, do not promise something that you may not be able to deliver. The best that I actually have been able to do is to admit that I really do have most of the equipment that I want now (it is a multi year accumulation), and there are only a couple more lenses and some accessories I would like to find. I can do almost anything I really need to do now, from 16 mm through 35 mm and 6 x 6 and now on up to 4 by 5. In fact, I have wondered if this feeling of satiation with camera equipment is real, or normal, or if I should be seeking the counsel of a professional camera merchant to see if this belief or condition can be eliminated or at least reduced.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

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