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  1. #11
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    Japanese is much the same in that respect. The verbs are at the end of the sentence.

    PE

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uhner View Post
    I second that recommendation.

    Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words and that you hence may have to search using headwords.
    This is a very common feature of Dutch as well, we can combine almost any combination of words, while still being valid Dutch, but bear in mind that the individual words a compound word is made up of, does NOT necessarily equate to the meaning of the compound...:o

    For example in Dutch you can say "moederskindje" ("moeder" is mother in English, "kind" is child), as to mean a grown up or adolescent that is still being pampered by his mother, which is as you can see a completely different meaning than the individual "headwords"!
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco B View Post
    For example in Dutch you can say "moederskindje" ("moeder" is mother in English, "kind" is child), as to mean a grown up or adolescent that is still being pampered by his mother, which is as you can see a completely different meaning than the individual "headwords"!
    Virtually identical to the English version with the same meaning, "mommy's boy".

    Lee

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco B View Post
    This is a very common feature of Dutch as well, we can combine almost any combination of words
    Yes, this is also a feature of the Scandinavian languages as well. But, given the increased use of English in everyday culture, education and the workplace, several people seems to have lost the ability to write compound words as one word. This is a problem at least in Sweden, I’m not sure of the situation in Denmark and Norway.

  5. #15

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    [QUOTE=Uhner;694528]I second that recommendation.

    "Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words "

    I am so old that I can remember when American English actualy used compound words! Now even multi-sylible words are rare. I don't know about British English, but here anything that cannot be well represented by a stick drawing is beyond the kin of the "Publicly Educated".
    Yes, I am just a "bitter old furt".
    Bill

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbillbugman View Post
    Yes, I am just a "bitter old furt".
    Bill - you must have been publicly educated. Everyone knows you spell fart with an "a". It's one of the oldest words in the English language. Even back to Middle English, where it occurs in Chaucer's "Miller's Tale", one of the Canterbury Tales. ;^)

    Kirk

  7. #17
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    Let me suggest that you try a real German dictionary. That eliminates the odd translation problem entirely. My favourite has been the Wahrig; I usually found it more useful than the Duden. You might need a more technical one but in any case, a good Deutsches Woerterbuch is less likely to steer you in the wrong direction than a German-English one.

    Anyway, scientific German is quite easy for English speakers. Literature, now sometimes that can be just about untranslatable.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #18
    AgX
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    But with all that whe should not forget that part of our problems are house-made.
    To stay at the topic: in our world we know three different meanings of `grain´...

    In German we more often differerentiate between `Kristall´ and `Korn´, but still this only slightly reduces the ambiguity.
    Last edited by AgX; 10-16-2008 at 02:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    But with all that whe should not forget that part of our problems are house-made.
    To stay at the topic: in our world we know three different meanings of `grain´...

    In German we more often differerentiate between `Kristall´ and `Korn´, but still this only slightly reduces the ambiguity.

  10. #20
    AgX
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    Yes, in three lines I at least make two typing errors, and still overlook one after correcting the other...

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