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  1. #1

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    Mitteilungen Aus Den Forschungslaboratorien Der Agfa, Volumes I-IV

    Has anyone heard of these books? -
    Mitteilungen Aus Den Forschungslaboratorien Der Agfa, Volumes I-IV

    I just bought a set. I know it's in German, so I guess I better study up. And does anyone know of a good German to English photographic dictionary?

    Kirk

  2. #2
    dwross's Avatar
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    Hi Kirk,
    Cool! What is the copyright date on the set? I've been working through Eder with the help of "German-English Science Dictionary" by Louis De Vries, 1959, and "Heath's German Dictionary" by Elizabeth Weir, 1888. Between them, they seem to cover the bases.

    I imagine you'll get some good advice from the German emulsioneers here.

    Denise

  3. #3
    AgX
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    Kirk,

    A decent photographic De/En dictionary is "Fachwörterbuch Optik, Foto, Video" by Günther Richter.
    (on surplus over here right now)
    But it won't be of much help concerning photochemical topics.

  4. #4

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    Denise - oldest volume is from about 1954 and then the others came out every two years or so. At least it will not be printed in the old deutsche Schrift - Fraktur I think it's called. I'm Ok with Eszetts, but the rest I find hard to read...

  5. #5
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    Kirk;

    I can help to some extent. Let me know where / if you get hung up. I have several dictionaries here, but overcoat in German translates into "basting sauce (as in roast)" with one dictionary, so it is not helpful unless I know the context. Of course, you usually don't use a basting sauce in emulsion making and coatinig.

    PE

  6. #6
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    I find these two useful. Both have more technical terms than the common printed dictionaries.

    http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/

    http://dict.leo.org/

  7. #7
    AgX
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    Kirk,

    The most recent one, and seemingly covering the whole imaging field is:


    Mühle: Wörterbuch der Bildtechnik - Dictionary of Imaging
    Oscar Brandstetter Verlag


    I have not held in my hands, but it's already on my wishlist.

    But concerning that Agfa publication, you better take that offer by PE.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Struan Gray View Post
    I find these two useful. Both have more technical terms than the common printed dictionaries.

    http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/

    http://dict.leo.org/
    I second that recommendation.

    Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words and that you hence may have to search using headwords.

  9. #9
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    I suggest that you all read "That Awful German Language" by Mark Twain. I hope I got that title right. I read it in College while taking German and had a very good laugh over compound words and split verbs.

    One example that I remember approximately "she de from the train station parted". It was done as a practical joke by the author translating German literally into English and then making side comments.

    PE

  10. #10
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    "Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth."

    From - I think - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.

    The academic version of this is that German theses always come in two volumes. The second contains the verbs.

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