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  1. #31
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Kirk,

    I'm running several vintages of Ubuntu now and for the last 3 years or so. I've tried a few others, including Red Hat, but that was back at 5.2 or so, ancient history in computer years. Fedora 3 and later should use RPM (Red Hat Package Manager) binary repositories. Ubuntu is built on Debian and uses .deb binary packages. Nearly any current linux you pick will have binary package management. Fedora is now at 10, so you might want to try it if you'd feel more at home there. Even software that isn't in official distribution repositories is often available in .rpm and .deb form on various web sites.

    You should also be able to easily dual boot MS and linux if you have enough space on your hard drive, or a slot for another hard drive. I do that with a couple of machines here to keep other people in the family happy. I prefer to add a dedicated linux hard drive, and storage is pretty cheap now. Linux can also now read and write NTFS, and someone's done a program that allows MS Windows to read/write ext3 *nix formatted drives.

    Lee

  2. #32
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    Funny, I messed with LM34/35 + Arduino a few years ago too. Making the sensor waterproof was a pain but also a challenge.

    Ubuntu is a good platform for the Arduino IMHO. If you are serious about Arduino, you need to learn C asap and C under Linux is natural.

    There is a pretty good learning curve even with a great environment like the Arduino offers. So plan on doing very small things, like learning to blink an LED, before you even think about serial stuff.

    I thought a lot of these site:
    www.sparkfun.com - general hardware
    www.moderndevice.com - kit forms of the Arduino hardware.

    Good luck.
    steve.

  3. #33

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    OK - I got the Arduino, and I've blinked the LED. I wasn't able to find a LM-34/5, but I've got a DS18S20 too. I need to find my breadboarding stuff and some time to try it out. It looks like it should work nicely.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  4. #34

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    I googled Arduino and it is seriously cool.
    Years ago I found a text file on 'dream goggles'.. An IR emitter/sensor that bounces off of your eye and waits for a change (REM sleep), once that happens it blinks an LED light to let you know that you are dreaming.. Pretty cool stuff, I just remember the software being kludgey but it did work.

    Arduino would be perfect for that.. OT sorry.. just wanted to say thanks for the heads up on that.

  5. #35

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    After a bit of programming help from my cousin's husband who programs in C and Java professionally, I can data log temps with the Arduino board and either a Maxim-IC.com DS18B20 or DS18S20 1-wire serial temperature sensor (they have different software requirements). Total parts used are the Arduino board ($35), a breadboard ($10), a 4.7K ohm resistor ($0.01), a couple bits of 24 ga. wire, and 1 to 3 temps sensors (free samples can be obtained from Maxim-IC).

    Now to hard wire everything and put the sensors in to stainless tubing, and do a bit of soldering, it should be up and running. We're still putting a bit of prettiness in to the logging program, which time stamps the data and writes to a text file. I'll post the code for it when it gets finalized.

    In the mean time, for those that want a cheaper and commercially available option, look into the Go!Temp sensor from Vernier.com http://www.vernier.com/go/gotemp.html It's $39 with its own data logging software. That's a pretty sweet deal. Looking at the specs, it's got the same accuracy and prescision as the Maxim chips I used above. The Go!Temp probe also plugs directly into the USB port so no additional hardware is needed as in the do-it-yourself approach.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  6. #36
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Very nice Kirk. I was wondering a couple of days ago how things were progressing. Thanks for posting the sources for hardware. I'm looking forward to seeing the code.

    Lee

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