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  1. #1

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    Fifty one year old Kodak documentary

    Apologies if this has already been posted on APUG; I did a Google Advanced Search under apug.org and couldn't find it. Narration in Dutch, of which I speak not one word, isn't much of an impediment to understanding for those who live film.

    I suspect that, other than updated machines with more elaborate control systems, it's done pretty much the same today. Ron, please correct if that's wrong, and enjoy your trip down memory lane. Can you identify the buildings?

    http://www.super8.nl/howfilmismade.htm

  2. #2
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    I would love to hear that with English narration. At least I could figure out when silver nitrate was mentioned. It's very nice to see a video about film production which doesn't mention 135 film!
    Charles Hohenstein

  3. #3

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    What a great movie, thank you Sal!

    Richard Wasserman

  4. #4
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    Thanks Sal.

    I didn't need narration.

    However, the trough coater shown was obsolete in the 40s from what I was told. In the 50s they were using all extrusion hoppers.

    PE

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That was great!

    And that's exactly how Ron does it in his workshop, except nowadays the big silver ingots come by truck, and we have to polish our shoes by hand.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Obsolete or not, a great bit to watch. Thanks so much.
    my real name, imagine that.

  7. #7
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    BTW, the film casting machine uses an extrusion hopper at the top of the wheel to apply the cellulose acetate to the wheel. You can see the entire drying section with cabinets.

    In the photo of Kodak Park, the low building in the foreground on the corner of Lake and Ridge was torn down to make room for the new coating machine that reaches for nearly the full block running west (towards the left in the photo). The new building is much higher as well, probably 5 floors at least.

    PE

  8. #8

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    Thanks for a real treat.


  9. #9
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    It was good BUT it looked as though film wasn't light sesitive. I know film is~!!What part of the process does the film have to be require to be without light. The emulsion process looked as if it just was regularly added with lights on and guys in white suits cutting and inspecting without fear of exposure. It was probably mentioned verbally but that part was unavailible to English speaking observers.
    I'm going to watch again to see what I missed.
    Last edited by dances_w_clouds; 02-02-2009 at 07:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
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    The lights go out the minute the Silver Nitrate is being added to the kettle of salts and gelatin. They stay out until the film is packed in the paper backing and sealed.

    What you saw was probably a film of a test run or pilot run at full scale of the equipment. We do this even today, sometimes with dummy chemistry and sometimes with just water. I ran a lot of pilot "water runs" to test new equipment or software.

    Sometimes I ran real stuff in the light just to see if things went the way I wanted them to and the result was an analysis of the grain and things like that.

    PE

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