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  1. #21
    Malco_123's Avatar
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    Ok thanks, The stainless steel should look nice, or maybe a copper that has been coated with some sort of plastic....
    owell steel should do fine.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I missed the molecular weight as I have a small crib sheet due to my old age. Ray can attest to how old we are both getting.
    I'm sure he looked it up.

    PE
    Ouch!
    Right and wrong at the same time!

    Actually,
    AgNO3 and KBr are the ony two I have committed to memory!

    I did confirm before posting though as I was afraid the scientists that rule the world might have changed their minds without consulting me first.

    What's a crib sheet?

  3. #23
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    A cheat sheet! No need for the "ouch" as there was a similey in there for you Ray.

    PE

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Do not use copper, Aluminum, Zinc or Iron. The only metals that emulsions tolerate well are Stainless Steel and Titanium. They will corrode most others and in doing so will fog or spoil in some way.PE
    Have you heard of having trouble (after much use) with even with Kodak's kettles ?
    I even mean cosmetic defects - forgetting fog etc. for the time being...
    I ask because I've seen presumably very good quality research kettles in different labs (RIT for instance) get pock marks during normal use.

    Ray

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    there was a similey in there for you Ray.
    PE
    Thank You.
    Simileys are good.
    The World Needs More Simileys!

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Do not use copper, Aluminum, Zinc or Iron. The only metals that emulsions tolerate well are Stainless Steel and Titanium. They will corrode most others and in doing so will fog or spoil in some way.
    Hello PE.

    Does titanium oxide tolerate the emulsion? It's not that I'm going to try it, but theoretically, that would be ideal to use it for contact prints, plate to plate.
    Thanks in advance.

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Anon;

    I'm not sure what you mean, but TiO2 is harmless as far as emulsions go. You can mix it with raw emulsion with no effect whatsoever. Titanium metal is used for many kettles to make emulsions.

    Ray;

    You need 316 or 308 stainless (non-magnetic) for the best results with emuslions. Even better is Titanium. Passivation is useful on any stainless.

    PE

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Anon;

    I'm not sure what you mean, but TiO2 is harmless as far as emulsions go. You can mix it with raw emulsion with no effect whatsoever. Titanium metal is used for many kettles to make emulsions.
    Well, it was Malco's idea to use some kind of plate to make positives:

    Is there any metals that the emulsion is particularly reactive to? I was thinking of spreading the emulsions onto a metal plate, probably copper, aluminum, or zinc, and then making the positive onto that.
    I was thinking that TiO2 could be used to make a bright white base, then coat some emulsion on it. Once you have that, you can take any plate, film, whatever you have and contact print on the TiO2 coated plate. I wasn't saying that you could contact print one TiO2 plate on another. But then, I didn't express my thought nicely.

  9. #29
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    Well, TiO2 is used in all RC papers AFAIK, and Barium Sulfate (Baryta) is used in all FB paper. Both can be mixed with either emulsions or gelatin and can be coated on paper, film or glass.

    PE

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Well, TiO2 is used in all RC papers AFAIK, and Barium Sulfate (Baryta) is used in all FB paper. Both can be mixed with either emulsions or gelatin and can be coated on paper, film or glass.

    PE
    Interesting, I didn't know that...

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