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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Ray;

    The clean uncoated plates are warmed in the oven before coating.

    They are coated warm and then chilled. When chilled they set up and can then be placed in a cool dark drying rack!

    PE
    I understand that they are still un coated, but what I am thnking about is spoiling the glass surface...

    So after all the effort of cleaning the plates to remove all traces of dust, dirt oils and grease... you just (gently) drop them onto the ktchen oven rack... flat I presume... for a short heating?

    Well, if it works it works- but it seems a bit odd to clean something so well and then put them face down in the kitchen oven.

    How long do you heat them for?

    Ray

  2. #52

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    No- really my oven is clean!!

    OK, I suppose if you use your oven more often than I do, a nice piece of silpat or possibly one of those dollar store aluminum turkey tins would suffice to lay the glass in when heating.

    I turn on my oven to warm, and let it heat to about 150, then throw the plates in for about 5 - 10 minutes. I do not measure the temperature precisely, but more by feel (gloved hands, of course)

  3. #53
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    So, stack them up and discard the top and bottom plates. The rest are protected from the oven environment except for the heat.

    PE

  4. #54

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    Say, how about a good old record player....


    A table-top centrifuge with a rheostat for exact rpm controle would be very effective for spin coating. I bought both the centrifuge and a table top rheostat for future use. Have not tried it yet. I need to figure out how to secure the glass plate while maintaning ballance.
    My research on table-top spincoaters indicate that I could buy a brand new Lexus for less $.
    Bill

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbillbugman View Post
    I need to figure out how to secure the glass plate while maintaning ballance.
    How about a circular plate made of 1/8" or 1/4" aluminum or similar, fitted with clips or ridges or a recess to hold the plate. The attachment to the rotary shaft would be via the underlying plate. Thus no attachments to the plate itself are necessary.

    Actually I don't think you need variable speed control, you just need reproducible speed. So a record player may be just fine. The thickness of the resulting film could be controlled by time and the viscosity of the fluid.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  6. #56

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    But the viscosity would have to be very low for record player rpm. The aluminum plate idea is a good one. It would fit right into the lip at the top of the centrifuge.
    Bill

  7. #57

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    As far as heating plates goes, Denise Ross uses a small food drier heater that is placed into a little plywood drying cabinet that she has in her darkroom. It's about a 1 or so square, and a few feet tall, and the food drier sits in the bottom. She then has shelves (or was it slots that the glass slips into) for the sheets of glass. She put them in and lets them get up to temp before she coats. It's a nice setup and takes just a little space from her darkroom.

    Hopefully, Denise will swing by here and correct any errors I made in the description.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  8. #58
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    I turn my hotplate on low and cover it with about 4 layers of paper towels. I place one 4x5 sheet of glass on at a time and the glass reaches about 100 F. The hotplate has an indicator lamp to tell when the heat is going above a certain value and I can control it easily from the front dial.

    This is a high-end hotplate. I don't suggest doing this with a unit with poor indication of overtemp or poor temp control.

    PE

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    This is a high-end hotplate. I don't suggest doing this with a unit with poor indication of overtemp or poor temp control.
    Yeah, the paper towels might catch fire with a cheap hot plate that doesn't have good heat distribution!
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  10. #60

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    I have an Infrared Thermometer that I bought at Harbor Freight for about $20. It has a laser pointer to show you where you are aiming it and a digital readout to tell you the temperature of the surface that you are measuring. It might be a handy device for figuring out it your plates are at the right temperature.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!



 

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