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  1. #61
    dwross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    As far as heating plates goes, Denise Ross uses a small food drier heater that is placed into a little plywood drying cabinet that she has in her darkroom. It's about a 1 or so square, and a few feet tall, and the food drier sits in the bottom. She then has shelves (or was it slots that the glass slips into) for the sheets of glass. She put them in and lets them get up to temp before she coats. It's a nice setup and takes just a little space from her darkroom.

    Hopefully, Denise will swing by here and correct any errors I made in the description.
    You did good, Kirk! And I do have a nice setup, if I say so myself . I live in a climate that's decidedly chilly a good deal of the time. My little warming box just takes that chill off my plates. I don't think elaborate (i.e. expensive) heating devices are necessary for your glass plates. In truth, the real variable creeps in as you transfer your plates to the coating area. It's hard to even guess how many degrees are lost in the process. I go so far as to warm up my darkroom to about 72F before I start coating, and that seems to be enough to do the trick.

    Far more important is keeping the emulsion temperature within a narrow range, and making each batch of emulsion small enough that you can get the coating done quickly. Emulsion continues to ripen as it sits. Too long in the holding bath and it can even start to fog. That's also the main problem with planning on re-using emulsion from a previous session. Even if you don't add hardener (and I don't to my negative emulsions), the re-heating process will significantly change the characteristic curve of finished plates.

    d

  2. #62

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    Qs

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    ... a small food drier heater....
    What is a Food Drier Heater?
    Farm equipment or something like that?
    What foods need dryers?

    What is Harbor Freight and what sort of products do they sell?

    Ray

  3. #63
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    I figure this link is a natural to your location, Ray!

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-...ehydrator.aspx

    Read about the convection style on the second page, and let Google do your walking from there.
    d

  4. #64
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    Re: Pouring plates, big ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers
    ... a small food drier heater....
    What is a Food Drier Heater?
    Maybe something to dehydrate food?

    Harbor Freight is a hardware store.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    What is Harbor Freight and what sort of products do they sell?
    Harbor Freight sells mostly imported tools. From what I saw, it's not near the quality of what you can pick up at Sears.

    Anyway, the IR temp meter was inexpensive and works.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by willrea View Post
    Maybe something to dehydrate food?
    Yes, a food dehydrator. But Denise is using just the heater and putting that into a cabinet.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by willrea View Post
    Maybe something to dehydrate food?

    Harbor Freight is a hardware store.
    OIC.

    I totally forgot about dried herbs, dried tomatoes, friut leathers, figs, apricots and so on. The pound or so of herb I might wish to dry just air dries naturally.

    Ray

  8. #68

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    In truth, the real variable creeps in as you transfer your plates to the coating area. It's hard to even guess how many degrees are lost in the process.

    .................................................. .................................................. ..

    Denise,
    Have you thought about heating your coating frame? I use a coating frame similar to your`s. But I use oinly one glass frame for multiple plates. As I recall,you set up a frame for each plate. A small amount of heat, like a heating pad on low, under the frame would keep the heating frame at constant temperature. You could keep the plates in the dehydrater. Then transfer to the heated frame.
    This is pure conjection on my part. I use one frame, unheated, for multiple coatings. I do not heat the plates
    But the truth is: No matter what the coating method, I am a putz, no matter what the method.
    Bill

  9. #69
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    Hi Bill,

    Before I coat my plates, before even I start melting the noodles, I arrange all the plates for coating. I set each plate on a piece of silicon matting that is in turn set on a piece of rigid acrylic. I surround each plate with four strips of glass to allow the emulsion well and coating rod to ride quickly and evenly over the whole of the plate. The strips stay in place until the plate is dry. They keep the emulsion from running all over the place before it sets up. I don't preheat the glass. I coat so quickly (2-3 seconds/plate) that room temperature glass is actually an advantage. By the time I have washed and dried the well and puddle pusher for the next plate coating, the plate I just coated has set up enough to carefully move out of the way for complete drying on a level shelf.

    And you are not a putz. Far from it. You do remarkably well considering what your poor hands have been through. I keep trying to think of a way to make it easier for you. We'll come up with something.
    d

  10. #70
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    A water bourn clear coating might work.
    Bill
    Just got back and was very surprised to see so many posts??!!
    Bill, from page 2: I tried that, ie. water based polyurethane sub coated glass, and the ENTIRE image lifted off into my hands. I'd dried the developed subbed plate in the oven because it had bubbled and lifted off the glass in room humidity. It is very dry in the oven because of the pilot light; it went flat; humidity in the room caused it to totally lift off even after it had gotten flat. It was flat long enough to scan into the computer.
    Lifted off free emulsion pictures is something to keep in mind for very expirmental works. The emulsion, free from the glass, is very tough like leather and will not tear easily. It could be glued onto things.
    Last edited by studiocarter; 10-23-2009 at 08:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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