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  1. #71

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    Studiocarter,
    You may have misunderstood. I was not sugesting water based subing. I was sugesting water based EDGING, specificly for collodion. The idea is to have the collodion repelled by the coating at the edges only, not to coat the entire plate with water based subbing.
    I dip the edges of each cleaned plate(wearing powder-free gloves) into hot wax.
    When I pour my emulsion, the emulsion is repelled from the edges but adheres very well to the clean glass. Lack of adhesion of emulsion to glass is NEVER one of my problems.
    Bill

  2. #72

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    I keep trying to think of a way to make it easier for you. We'll come up with something.
    d[/QUOTE]

    Denise,
    Think of a way to get me intrested in kniting or basket weaving, or something that dose not involve substances in a fluid state.
    Every one else,
    My recomendation for a waterbourne coating was specificly for Collodion. NOT for silver gelatin emulsions!
    Bill

  3. #73

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    hi bill

    you don't sub your dry plates ?
    maybe i am misreading what you wrote, but you get your emulsion to
    anchor onto the smooth glass surface without an intermediary layer for the emulsion to grab onto ?
    i've never been that lucky ...

    i've coated plates since the 1980s and in the beginning my biggest stumbling block was not knowing how to get the emulsion to stick the glass.
    i had no problem getting the glass very very clean, but no matter what i did,
    emulsion lifting off of the plate was always an issue.

    in the end i was able to control the "lift" so i could make it happen when i
    wanted it to and get a hand poured version of a polaroid emulsion transfer but on glass instead of on paper ...
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

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  4. #74
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    I don't sub glass plates and AFAIK, many brands of commercial glass plates were not subbed.

    The key, I am told, is the chrome alum hardener.

    PE

  5. #75

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    thanks ron!

    john
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

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  6. #76

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    [QUOTE=jnanian;883088]hi bill

    you don't sub your dry plates ?
    maybe i am misreading what you wrote, but you get your emulsion to
    anchor onto the smooth glass surface without an intermediary layer for the emulsion to grab onto ?
    i've never been that lucky .
    ================================================== =======
    Yes,
    On The Light Farm website,I have an articlal that describes how I clean glass. I have been working with phographic images on glass for at leat 12 years now, and with silver.gelatin emulsion making for only two years. Cleaning is essential.
    I do not always use hardener. And when I do it may be chrome alum or it may be glyoxal and even(Shhhhh!)formaldehyde. But no matter what hardener I use,or don't use, I Repeat, I never have frilling or lifting from the glass. Try my glass cleaning method.
    Bill:rolleyes:

  7. #77

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    thanks bill
    i think i will do just that,
    thanks for letting me know about your article!

    john
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  8. #78
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    I'd like to add my support for Bill's creds as a glass authority. I don't know anyone who has more experience with more processes on glass than Bill. When Bill talks glass, I know I listen. I will add, from my own experience with silver gelatin dry plate emulsions, glyoxal is only suitable if what you want is a beautiful emulsion transfer. Michael Carter is spot-on with that observation.

    And, a short additional note about chrome alum. It certainly doesn't do any harm, but it really isn't necessary for most people making dry plates today. Back when, it was used by the makers of commercial plates mostly because they didn't know the temperatures people would be working with. Today, with A/C, ice cubes, and digital thermometers, we don't have to worry so much about summer darkroom conditions. The same goes for added preservatives.

    There is a downside to adding alum, at least for beginning or casual plate makers. It takes at least a couple of days to fully work. If you know for an absolute fact that you have ripened your emulsion to precisely the right point, this is all fine and dandy. But, if you have passed even a little bit into over-ripening, your plates can pick up a bit of fog before the alum has completely cured. If you under-ripened, your plates may continue to pick up speed. If there is significant time between the time you expose and process the first plate in a batch and the last plate, they may be fairly different plates, which makes exposure testing harder than it need be.

    So...my advice is to keep things as simple as possible. Make small batches of emulsion and make them often. Don't think in terms making 'enough plates to last awhile', at least as you are starting out. If ever an old saying was true, it's here. Practice makes perfect.

    It's really exciting to see all the new work being done with emulsions, including PE's continuing research. It will be very interesting to read this forum five years from now!

    d

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwross View Post
    It's really exciting to see all the new work being done with emulsions, including PE's continuing research. It will be very interesting to read this forum five years from now!
    That's a very nice thought. New techniques will be available due to the hard work of all the thinkers and tinkerers, and I suppose that the analogue images will be even more distinctive and valuable.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #80
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    Glass Dry Plate Photograph that is 8x15 inches



    Liquid Light emulsion on glass 8x15 inches. F45 for 15 seconds with a big old brass lens in a Vageeswari Camera Works camera. Sun was 320 -1 block or 280 foot candles. Development was in Dektol 1:3 in 2 min 45 seconds.



 

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