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  1. #1
    studiocarter's Avatar
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    Pouring plates, big ones.

    There is a video to watch on line that shows a 20 x 24 inch plate being poured. It is on the John Coffer web site. http://www.johncoffer.com/
    On the left side it says "videos", go there and choose the longest one, ten minuets.
    Now, this is a wet plate video, but it is a huge plate that is hand poured. I am into dry plates and have hand poured 4 x 5 inch plates and am sweating how to do 12 x 15 inch ones. I suppose that if the liquid emulsion is thin, warm, and spritzed with Everclear it'd cover a large surface in red light. Perhaps a piece of marble could be warmed and the glass set on it. If there was a gimble under it, it could be tipped this way and that and thus eliminate hot finger spots. John used his hands, but he used a metal plate. It didn't matter.
    Has anyone here poured large plates for dry plate photography? How?

  2. #2

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    I've got some 12x20 in plates in the darkroom awaiting this. I've done 5x7 and 8x10 with varying degrees of success... I was actually going to try a glass rod for the big ones.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  3. #3

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    Hello,
    I wonder if a large heating pad, from the drug store, would work. You could tape it securely to the back of the glass plate. Then use those stick on temperature strips to measure the temperature of the plate, once it is stable. Then bring the emulsion to the same temperature and pour your hot little heart out. I have used this method for Gum/dichromate on glass. It works well for that purpose.
    Bill

  4. #4

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    P.S. For pouring plates without tipping, I dip my edges (the plate edges that is) into hot parafin. The emulsion is repelled by the wax.

  5. #5
    studiocarter's Avatar
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    That could lead to thick emulsions if not carefully done.

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    All this is beyond my abilities. I'll stick with film... until it's NLA... but by then I'll probably be NLA too.

  7. #7
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    Big plates were usually made from huge sheets of glass that had the emulsion poured onto them from a cascade trough. The dried sheets were then cut up into the desired plate sizes.

    PE

  8. #8
    studiocarter's Avatar
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    Hey, these ideas are great and got me thinking more, along with am coffee...
    Would the wax repell collodian? If so, they, ie wet plates, could be used in metal book form dry plate holders and the front edges wouldn't get messed up.
    An old window frame could be used to hold onto glass while tipping and pouring; a hole, cork, and spout in a corner would let out excess material; waxed edges would keep it all clean. The frame would have to be the same size as the camera.
    Well, why not make a window frame camera? Corners often get loose so it could be taken apart and grooves cut for a dark slide. Lots of windows are trashed around here when new ones are installed. I've used them for silk screen printing. Also, I've sand blasted glass in a stone shop as well as handled hydrofloric acid which eats glass to frost it, so that is possible to do as long as a shop is nearby making granite memorials. Bathtub refinishing companies also use that acid.
    Glass could be silk screened and if warmed any texture would smooth out; that's a guess, screens can be huge, not as large as for a cascade trough but large enough to cut up glass after coating. Anyway, if large enough, texture would not matter from the diagonal viewing distance.

  9. #9
    studiocarter's Avatar
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    Mike1234, if I thought like you, I'd-a bought or bid on that 12x20 camera that just sold on the bay for $811. It took film.

  10. #10
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    Some sort of frame around the glass plate to hold it during the pour would be nice.

    How about a takeoff on Sandy King's method. Lay the plate on a large metal surface and put magnetic strips down each side of the plate to hold it tight against the metal. Then pour.

    The magnets can be custom cut to the size of your plate.

    I have a set of custom coating blades for plates.

    PE

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