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  1. #1
    zolveria's Avatar
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    Colloid on Glass Question

    Is there a way i can Place colloid on glass and place under my enlarger
    and transfer that to the emulsion?

    Or do i have to use a pinhole camera?

    I just saw a video and I am awed... these will make nice Xmas Present for my family.

  2. #2

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    Hi,
    I do not realy understand what you are asking.. Are you asking "Can one use a Colloid plate as a contact negative? If that is your question-Of course. But the "emulsion" must be of enlarger speed.
    What dose a pinhole camera have to do with this?
    I think that no one else has responded to your question because it is just not clear as to what you want to do.
    Bill.
    Bill

  3. #3
    zolveria's Avatar
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    What I am asking is..
    When you place the colloid on the glass .. and after you bathe it.
    Do you have to use a camera to expose the image to the emulsion.

    What i would like to do is. expose the emulsion with my enlarger and not the camera ?

  4. #4

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    Hmmmmm, I think I know what you mean. I thought that Wet plate Collodion (sensitized with silver nitrate) is mainly UV sensitive, so that may be a problem with an enlarger. Dry plate would be a different issue I think. K
    Kal Khogali

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  5. #5

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    i have made dry plates that i used instead enlarging paper, the emulsion
    is basically paper emulsion ... wet plates, as kal said,
    are sensitive to a different type of light ... making enlargements might be troublesome.
    ( and collodion is flammable ("sensitive" ) to heat. )

  6. #6

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    Hello zolveria,

    I have used an enlarger (tungsten lamp) to make wet-plate collodion on glass positives from B&W film negatives and ambrotypes from B&W film transparencies. The exposure time was 5-8 minutes, but works quite well. There are many variables, so your results will differ. I do not have a working set-up to use sunlight, as was used in the old days, and some people use today. I wanted to make images of subjects that could not be still long enough for wet-plate. Another thing to note: Wet-plate has a very different spectral response than panchromatic film, so if you use a panchromatic negative the results will look quite different than a wet-plate of the same scene. Also, wet-plate is extremely fine-grained. The enlarged image of a film negative may not have as fine a grain. Tonal range and Dmax are also factors. I did not find this to be a problem for my purposes.

    If you already do wet-plate, give it a go. If not, the harder part (and most fun), is making wet plates. It is magic! (So is making silver-gelatin emulsions).

    Cheers,
    Clarence
    Last edited by CRhymer; 05-27-2010 at 08:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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