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  1. #1
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Bleach , Replacing Silver

    Ron ,

    I dont know if this is right forum .
    But I want to write for the people who have not read my previous posts.
    I asked couple of questions to Eastman House and They directed me to

    Nancy Martin

    The John M. and Barbara Keil University Archivist and Rochester Collections Librarian

    Department of Rare Books and Special Collections

    Rush Rhees Library

    University of Rochester

    Rochester, NY 14627-0055

    585-275-9337


    She is responsible of some of earliest archive papers of Kodak.

    I finally reached a technology which I had no idea but may be interested the people about dyeing an slide BW film. It is for 2 color process.

    You need to do For both colors the original silver image was bleached with a rehalogenating bleach, and then replaced stoichometrically with another metal compound

    Than

    All the standard photographic texts will have formulas for all sorts of bleaches. So will the pamphlets of photochemical manufacturers. Dichromate bleaches with added chloride or bromide will rehalogenate image silver.

    The interest in final images composed of platinum, palladium, and other metals was of great interest for artistic paper prints in the albumen paper era, late 1800s, and the old formulas are all gathered in Towler's The Silver Sunbeam.

    Now the question :

    Is there a technique to replace film silver with platin , palladium or gold .
    And also smaller sized metals than the film silver ?

    Is it tried for film and can there be a advantage ?

    Best ,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Istanbul

  2. #2
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    Mustafa;

    You caannot (or should not) use a Dhchromate bleach for rehalogenizing. You should use a Ferricyanide bleach for this type of process. I know that some metals can be used to replace silver images to give various colored images, and even silver itself can be re-formed to give different colors.

    The process itself is very complex if you wish even some degree of color, as it is similar to the original Kodakchrome process but with metals, not dyes.

    PE

  3. #3
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Ron ,

    Is there a profit at replacing metalic content for example better bw result ?
    Is it possible to do it with platin , palladium , gold ?
    It seems to me very interesting.

    Umut

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    Yes. It is common to use a gold toner for color effects and stability. There are many examples of such. Forming Sulfides is a common method as is using the blue toners made by using ferricyanide.

    PE

  5. #5

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    Keep in mind that most toners simply plate or coat the silver, and not replace it.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  6. #6
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Is it possible to tone with platin , palladium to bw film ?
    And ı am still looking for replacement silver to platin palladium technology.

    And advise is very welcome.

    Umut

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    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    kodak 92 bleach patent and replacing silver to palladium

    Ron , I found this for bleaching. Is process toxic or expensive ?
    I want to switch to a pinhole anamorphic camera. It produces 6*17 cms bw slides.
    Is it possible to bleach the tri x big slide and replace the silver with palladium and get palladium alt process look from the slides ?

    SILVER IMAGE BLEACHING PROCESS Document Type and Number: WIPO Patent Application WO/1992/004659 Kind Code: A1 Abstract: A method for bleaching a silver image wherein the image is treated with a first solution comprising iodine and an iodide salt and then the iodine stain is removed by treating it with a second solution comprising ascorbic acid ans sulphite ions. The method is particularly useful for silver images formed by the silver salt diffusion transfer process. More Like This:
    JP52133215 NON_SILVER PHYSICALLY DEVELOPING SOLUTION FOR INTENSIFYING SILVER IMAG E
    JP60012542 SILVER HALIDE PHOTOSENSITIVE MATERIAL FOR PLATE MAKING AND ITS REDUCTION PROCESS
    JP53057832 PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGE FORMATION
    Inventors: Barnett
    Anthony
    Malcolm, Hallbery
    David
    Alan
    Application Number: PCT/EP1991/001659 Publication Date: March 19, 1992 Filing Date: September 03, 1991 Export Citation: Click for automatic bibliography generation Assignee: KODAK LIMITED EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY BARNETT
    Anthony
    Malcolm, Hallbery
    David
    Alan
    International Classes:G03C5/42; G03C11/04 Download PDF:View/Download PDF PDF Help Claims: CLAIMS :
    1. A method for bleaching a silver image wherein the image is treated with a first solution comprising iodine and an iodide salt and then the iodine stain is removed by treating it with a second solution comprising ascorbic acid and sulphite ions.
    2. A method as claimed in claim 1 in which the silver image to be treated is located on an imagewise exposed and fully processed photographic film or paper or on a printing plate made by the photographic silver salt diffusion transfer process.
    3. A method as claimed in Claim 1 or 2 in which the solutions are applied to the silver image using felt tipped pens.
    4. A method as claimed in any of claims 1 3 in which the first solution contains from 2 to 50g, preferably from 20g to 45g, of iodine per litre.
    5. A method as claimed in any of claims 1 4 in which the first solution contains from 50 to 250 g, preferably from 150g to 200g, of potassium iodide per litre.
    6. A method as claimed in any of claims 1 5 in which the solvent of the first solution comprises from 10 to 60% by weight of water.
    7. A method as claimed in any of claims 1 6 in which the second solution comprises an aqueous solution containing from 10 to lOOg, preferably from 40 to 80g, ascorbic acid and from 10 to lOOg, preferably from 30 to 70g, of potassium sulphite per litre.
    8. A deletion fluid kit comprising the first and second solutions as defined in any of claims 1 2 and 4 7.
    9. A deletion fluid kit as claimed in claim 8 in which the solutions are each contained in a felt tip pen.
    Description: SILVER IMAGE BLEACHING PROCESS
    This invention relates to a method of bleaching silver images and to solutions therefor. The photographic silver halide image forming process is well known. Sometimes it is desirable to retouch the silver image formed thereby and, specifically, it is sometimes desired to remove parts of the image such as unwanted spots. It is known, for example from British specification 2 107 889 that a thickened solution containing, for example, iodine and an iodide can achieve the desired result. A problem with this approach is that a brown stain is produced which is unsightly. In addition the compositions of 2 107 889 are only suitable for printing plates which do not have any gelatin layers. It is therefore desirable to be able to delete the silver image without causing any stain and to delete the silver image in a gelatin- containing layer.

    The present invention provides a method of removing silver images without causing any stain. According to the present invention there is provided a method for bleaching a silver image wherein the image is treated with a first solution comprising iodine and an iodide salt and then the iodine stain is ..emoved by treating it with a second solution comprising ascorbic acid and sulphite ions.

    The image is bleached rapidly and permanently, there is no stain and the solutions have a long life. The silver image to be treated may be on an imagewise exposed and fully processed photographic film or paper or on a printing plate made by the photographic silver salt diffusion transfer process. Such materials are described in Research Disclosure

    Item 308119, December 1989 published by Kenneth Mason Publications, Emsworth, Hants, United Kingdom.

    In a preferred embodiment of the present invention the solutions are applied to the silver image using "felt tipped" pens, preferably ones with a fine tip to ensure accurate application.

    The first solution, used to delete the silver image preferably contains a mixture of water and butyrolactone. The ratio of aqueous to organic solvent is optimised to provide sufficient water for rapid penetration of the solute into the gelatin layer on the image-bearing material, together with sufficient butyrolactone to obtain high complexing power for silver iodide so that the image is removed in a conveniently quick time. The first may also contain other solvents used alone or in combination including alcohols eg ethyl or butyl alcohol.

    The iodide may be provided by an ammonium or alkali metal iodide, eg sodium or potassium iodide. The first solution preferably contains from 2 to 50g, especially from 20g to 45g, of iodine and from 50g to 250 g, especially from 150g to 200g, of iodide ions per litre. The solvent preferably comprises from 10 to 60% by weight of water, the exact figures being dependent on the considerations outlined above.

    Preferably the first solution also contains a wetting agent and an acid.

    The second solution preferably contains from 10 to lOOg, especially from 40 to 80g, ascorbic acid and from 10 to lOOg, especially from 30 to 70g, of potasium sulphite per litre. The solution is preferably aqueous.

    The invention further provides a deletion fluid kit comprising the first and second solutions as

    defined above. Preferably the solutions are each contained in a felt tip pen.

    The following Example is included for a better understanding of the invention. The words KODAK and PMT are trademarks.

    EXAMPLE

    The following solutions were made up:

    SOLUTION A

    Iodine 26 g

    Potassium iodide 170 g

    ETHOQUAD C25 (surfactant) 1 g

    Butyrolactone 510 g Water 270 g

    Acetic acid 18 g

    SOLUTION B

    Ascorbic acid 60 g Potassium sulphite 50 g

    Water 1 litre

    Each solution was filled into a felt tip pen.

    Images were produced using Kodak PMT3 KNP negative paper, exposed on a Kodak Imagemaker Camera and processed in a Kodak 43DT Imagemate Processor onto a variety of Kodak PMT receivers. Images were deleted successfully from the following receivers in an average time of 20 secc"ds.

    PMT 3 KRPM Matt receiver paper

    PMT 3 KRPT Thin receiver paper

    PMT 3 KRPTA Adhesive thin receiver paper PMT 3 KRPG Glossy receiver paper

    PMT 3 KRF Receiver film

    PMT 3 KRFT Thin receiver film PMT II Metal litho plates

    Other materials tried were Kodak PMT II Paper Litho plates and Kodak Pagiset Phototypesetting paper. Images could be successfully deleted from both, but the deletion time was greater than 1 minute.

    Umut

  8. #8
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    I have no idea how applicable this would be to what you are trying to do.

    This seems to be limited to a certain family of products.

    PE



 

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