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  1. #11
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    PIctures would be great, would love to see what you've got!

  2. #12
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    Congratulations Ron! Welcome to the Film Club You're going to be having a blast. Making roll film opens up a world of possibilities. All those orphan cameras begging to be adopted! No reason to stop at 120. Don't forget its variant, 620, as well as 127 and 828 (sprocketless 35mm). I went out shooting last weekend with eight different cameras loaded with four different formats. Most fun I've had in just about forever. As soon as I get a new batch of rolls made for this coming weekend in the wonderously photogenic Oregon Cascades, I'll get a neg or two printed and posted. (I posted a picture of the selvage of a cut-out 120 roll on the thread about punching sprockets.)

    Many, many thanks again to Vaughn and Will for helping me collect enough backing paper and spools. Thanks, Guys! Free film-making lesson anytime you're in the neighborhood .

    I've been working with a very generous sample of 340 hydrophilic polyester given to me by its manufacturer. Coats and processes like a dream. I'll post all the details on TLF, with a link from here, as soon as I've worked out an arrangement for other people to get their hands on the product.

    carpe diem!
    Denise
    www.thelightfarm.com

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The 120 material

    Here is a photo of the latest that I have. There are about 1000 ft of 120 size acetate on that roll on the left. The 120 coater is preset at 2, 4, 6 and 8 mil undercut. Threre are two styles of 4" coaters behind the 120 coater. Behind them are sitting my 4x5 plate and film holders and a Polaroid holder that I use for 3x4 sheets or plates. Sorry for the flare on the one coater. It was at a bad angle.

    Enjoy!

    BTW, I have been coating on film since I first started emulsion coating and making, both at home and at EK so I joined the Film Club years ago! I had to pass a "quality" test as part of my learning process.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 120 coating.jpg  

  4. #14
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    So would the coaters be used by hand, and do they have a trough to hold the emlusion much like the larger "doctor blades"?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #15
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    Wow, not what I was expecting at all! How do they work? Does they have some kind of trough/funnel to feed it from above or do you just glop emulsion on the base and pull it through thereby giving an even coating?

  6. #16
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    Film coaters cannot use a leading well or reservoir. The leading element would scratch film. Therefore, they have a removable barrier or a small delivery system mounted to the top that can measure the emulsion as the coater moves. In the case of the barrier, the surface tension and viscosity of the emulsion holds it in place, but even without these devices, the coaters work but with more waste that runs off at the edges.

    You place the coater at the top edge of the film (or plate) and pour emulsion in front of the leading edge. If you have a barrier, the emulsion does not spread out, but if you do not, the emulsion spreads out quickly so you have to be agile. You draw the blade towards you and leave behind a beautiful sheet of film.

    The attachment shows a sheet of film for 4x5 format. Very high quality can be obtained by this method. Well, you have probably seen this photo before.

    The coaters shown will not work with paper due to swell caused by the unrestrained spread of emulsion without a well or leading weight.

    They are all hand operated devices.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Inspecting a coated sheet of emulsion.jpg  

  7. #17

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    Need any backing paper, for some reason I've saved some over the years.

    Mike

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Mike;

    So have I. I have 3 MF cameras and use them a lot. I process my own, so I have a drawer full. Thanks.

    PE

  9. #19
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    I love this kind of stuff. I cannot follow most of the technical stuff yet, but I applaud the things you are doing. Can't wait to see where you go with this!
    --------------------
    "Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it." -Paul Strand

    www.glasskeyphoto.com

  10. #20
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    So the key to these coaters is the tight tolerance of the "undercut"? The cubes on either side, do they slide along the surface while the diamond shaped bar is 2, 4, 6, or 8mm higher than that? I assume the bars are made to be rotated, with each side giving you a different emulsion thickness?

    Statements?

    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

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