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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu
    Dan, you are right. My problem is indeed specular reflections. But I can't figure out a way to put a light tent around insects in the field, as in this shot, for example.

    The other thing I have been trying is cross polarized flash, but so far my results have been miserable - need to experiment a bit more with it to figure out what the problem might be.

    -Anupam
    Sorry, Anupam, but as a cheapskate no-good rat of a nonsubscriber I can't view images in the gallery.

    I'm not sure that it is relevant, but in my aquarium photography I rely on geometry to control reflections from the tank's front. This might work for you.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Well, there are two controls for light:

    Size, relative to the subject, and
    Distance from the subject.

    Distance from the subject affects the gradation across the field,
    so if you want an even light across the field, you move the light back,
    but if you want a variation across the field, the light belongs close to the subject.

    I suppose if one is making a clinical image,
    the light should be further away,
    but for an expressive image, you can bring it close.
    All that you've typed is true, and I don't understand the distinction you make between clinical and expressive images.

    But and however, when shooting small mobile subjects in the field when and as they're found there are only two practical flash rigs. A flash bracket that somehow attaches to the camera body. A flash bracket that some how attaches to the lens or the camera's front standard. Flash brackets that stand on the ground aren't compatible with opportunistic shooting.

    Both of the setups place the flash(es) near the subject, offer limited depth of illumination (I don't know if the concept is new to you, I've carried it around for decades). The best way I've come up with to get well-lit backgrounds is to have an assistant hold a flash (usually the third one) about the right distance from the background.

    Obtaining, training, and keeping an assistant can be a problem. I once solved the problem by building a three-flash bracket for one of my friends. Heard his laments, went into the workshop, and emerged with a wife eliminator. And when his wife saw it, she instantly recognized what it was for. I found the thing too heavy and clumsy, but then it was really more a proof-of-concept prototype than a production version.

    Come to think of it, this discussion really belongs in the lighting forum. Moderator, do your duty!

    Cheers,

    Dan

  3. #13

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    Why is this seen as difficult or requiring a flashmeter? The question is: How much light is lost due to a diffuser?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  4. #14
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    A multiple flash setup is exactly what I have in mind Dan, only since I don't have a wife/girlfriend eliminator and since my girlfriend's fidgeting scares away the bugs anyway, I am trying a two flash setup.

    The idea is to have two flashes either side of the lens - the smaller flash, an SB-18 without adjustable outputs will light the subject while the other, a SB-28, will be aimed at the background. It's power will be adjusted depending on the distance of the background. I am also hoping that if I put the SB28 on wide angle, it'll spill enough light sideways to act like a kind of fill-flash to balance the SB18's light.

    -Anupam
    PS: My pic was a standard dewy damsel shot that is in my PN portfolio as well, the kind Arnab takes - so you know what I mean about popping a light tent on it - I'd have a damsel in quite a bit of distress

  5. #15
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Claire, I'll try out your method - I am guessing it might even work with an enlarger, right.

    Thanks,
    -Anupam

  6. #16

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  7. #17

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    I suppose that an enlarger would be workable. Lowere your head yo the bottom, remove your lens and carrier, tape the meter so the cell is in the center of the beam. Take a reading at a constant time. Note the fstop. Put the diffuser in the beam and note the fstop. How much light was lost? I would guess about 1.7 to 1.8 stops. As long as the light is bright enough to be well within the sensitivity ranhe of the meter it should work. As an altenate you could use daylight tomorrow.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  8. #18
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark H
    What about a ring flash?
    How would a ring flash help? As far as I can see, it would have the disadvantage of being close to the subject resulting in rapid falloff of light as has been pointed out in the above posts. Along with this it does not address the issue of background lighting, unless you are using an additional flash for that. Thirdly, sidelighting with fill looks nicer and more natural than flat front lighting.

    -A

  9. #19
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    I have one of the Lepp II brackets made by Saunders. I presume that it or an updated version is available. With the bracket you can mount 2 flash units and a camera. You can position the flash units where you want in relation to each other. The flash distances and angles can be adjusted. If your camera and flash units allow for TTL the flash output can be adjusted through the camera.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #20
    Buster6X6's Avatar
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    Hi Anupam
    I made a two flash unit out of desposable cameras I got from my photo store for free.I inserted the guts into a small plastic box and attached to commercial flash bracket. Works really good.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCF0483.JPG  
    Looking is a gift, but seeing is power.

    Buster6X6

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