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  1. #41
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    also,for max image sharpness, use the sweet spot aperture of your lens

    (that's typicallyaround f/8-11)
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #42
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Flexible tripods suck.
    and there are plenty of those.it's worth it to spend tthe money on a good one.they last a long time
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #43
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    At 1:1 a tripod is a requirement not a choice.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #44
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    Keep it simple, go for a tripod!

    Jeff
    a combination of flash and monopod is simple and effective.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    At 1:1 a tripod is a requirement not a choice.
    Steve, I have thousands of good (plane of best focus where I wanted it, well-exposed, sharp) Kodachromes shot handheld at 1:1. 105/2.8 MicroNikkor AIS on an FM2n with two small flashes mounted on a Spiratone Macrodapter. 55/2.8 MicroNikkor AIS and 55/3.5 MicroNikkor on an FM2n, Nikkormat ELW, and Nikkormat FTN with two small flashes mounted on a Jones of Hollywood macro bracket and several I made myself.

    For small moving subjects, including flowers when there's any wind at all, a tripod just gets in the way. So does a monopod.

    Been there, done that, am pleased with the results. Understand, however, that when I started out I was afraid to use flash.

  6. #46
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Dan, I am glad it works for you. I got better and consistent photographs at 1:1 with a tripod. I get good results with a tripod for time exposures, shifts and tilts, however normally I prefer not to use a tripod.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Dan, I am glad it works for you. I got better and consistent photographs at 1:1 with a tripod. I get good results with a tripod for time exposures, shifts and tilts, however normally I prefer not to use a tripod.
    I couldn't have got the shots handheld without flash. Shooting closeup without flash requires a tripod.

    I have great difficulty doing as well with my Graphics and Cambo. These have to be shot from tripod and are much slower working than a Nikon. They're absolutely impossible with small unconstrained fish in aquaria and with live insects that won't hold a pose for very long, are very difficult with flowers and such. What usually ruins my flower shots is wind, which can move the plane of best focus between the time I focus and compose and the time I get the shot off. Yes, I still use flash.

  8. #48
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    I couldn't have got the shots handheld without flash. Shooting closeup without flash requires a tripod.

    I have great difficulty doing as well with my Graphics and Cambo. These have to be shot from tripod and are much slower working than a Nikon. They're absolutely impossible with small unconstrained fish in aquaria and with live insects that won't hold a pose for very long, are very difficult with flowers and such. What usually ruins my flower shots is wind, which can move the plane of best focus between the time I focus and compose and the time I get the shot off. Yes, I still use flash.
    I agree,using a flash is the easiestway to get plentyof lightand a fast shutter speedbut getting the exposure right can be tricky;best to use a flashmeterand avoid the inverse square law,which fails when you get really close to the light source
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I agree,using a flash is the easiestway to get plentyof lightand a fast shutter speedbut getting the exposure right can be tricky;best to use a flashmeterand avoid the inverse square law,which fails when you get really close to the light source
    Ralph, you're a masochist. You think harder than is necessary.

    The easy way is to use a flash bracket that gives reproducible camera-flash-subject geometry and shoot a series of calibration shot. One shot at each full stop from the lens' largest to smallest aperture at 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:6. Use reversal film. Then you'll know which aperture to use given magnification and film speed. Linear interpolation for magnifications between the ones used for calibration works well. If the best stop is too small to suit you, put ND gels on the flash(es) and adjust the aperture accordingly. This approach requires no thinking or calculations in the field. Set the magnification desired, look up the aperture to use in the calibration table, start stalking your subject. Flashmeter, calculations, and even knowing the flash(es)' GN(s) are all unnecessary. Suck and try will do the job.

    The key to getting this to work is using a rigid bracket. I use two basic designs: Spiratone Macrodapter/Jones of Hollywood macro bracket, essentially a lens hood with a pair of flash shoes; rigid bracket with a pair of shoes that attaches securely to the camera. Both work but if you get the geometry right with the flash-on-lens type you'll get good exposure at the same nominal aperture (as set, not effective) over an interesting range of magnifications. The rig I use with my press and view cameras gives good exposure from 1:4 to 2:1 and the same f/stop set. This by test, first with a flashmeter (less expensive than testing with film if you have one) and then with film (ISO 100 E6).

    With my press and view cameras and a single hand-held flash, I use a tape measure and mental arithmetic to find extension, use GN arithmetic with adjustment for magnification to find the right power setting for a Vivitar 283 with VP-1 held ~ 1 foot from the subject. Works very well when a single flash will do.

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