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  1. #31
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    All very good, but ... Do they have a pigeon hole where they drop completed jobs etc. for collection after hours?
    I've got a pigeon hole at PRISM and it works a treat as I can stick my hand in and grab proofs, invoices, completed E6 jobs, bad jokes, plastic spoyders and maybe even put a cheque in there any time I'm up in the City of Sin, often on weekends. Quality control of E6 is very important. Have any problems been noticed, such as frames accidently cut when loading?
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Be not trepid, C41 is very forgiving. I store my chemicals in PETE bottles bought from the supermarket with drinking water in them. Dev will keep for 4months at least in the fridge with NO air in the bottle; bleach+fix will last years as long as it's not a blix.
    Thanks pg, but I'm a bit clueless on what PETE stands for????

  3. #33
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin D View Post
    Thanks pg, but I'm a bit clueless on what PETE stands for????
    "Polyethylene terephthalate"

    Recyclable plastic. Think soft drink bottles.

    Another really good way to store liquids is in dark green/brown wine bottles, and use a "Vacu Vin" style pump to remove air.

  4. #34
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    Like LJH says - softdrink / water bottles. The clear stuff, not the soft milky stuff. Look for a triangular "recyclable" imprint in the plastic of the bottle near the bottom, it should have a 1 in it and say PETE below. At least this coke bottle I'm looking at now does. PETE is used for softdrink bottles because its gas permeability is quite low, so the drinks don't go flat on the shelf and it's great for keeping the oxygen out of your developer.

    I use butane lighter-refill to exclude the oxygen. You must get it ALL out or the colour dev will die, even refrigerated.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    "Polyethylene terephthalate"

    Recyclable plastic. Think soft drink bottles.

    Another really good way to store liquids is in dark green/brown wine bottles, and use a "Vacu Vin" style pump to remove air.
    Thanks LJH, this weekend could be it if I can scrounge some bottles from the bin .

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Like LJH says - softdrink / water bottles. The clear stuff, not the soft milky stuff. Look for a triangular "recyclable" imprint in the plastic of the bottle near the bottom, it should have a 1 in it and say PETE below. At least this coke bottle I'm looking at now does. PETE is used for softdrink bottles because its gas permeability is quite low, so the drinks don't go flat on the shelf and it's great for keeping the oxygen out of your developer.

    I use butane lighter-refill to exclude the oxygen. You must get it ALL out or the colour dev will die, even refrigerated.
    Thanks pg, I knew there had to be a good reason for coke existing. Last weekend I came across a device used to expel air from opened wine bottles and replace it with an inert gas, I assume this would work with the c-41 chems like the butane gas. It was in a pressurised cyclinder and cost about $15 I think, might have to look into it a bit further.

  7. #37

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    Vacu vin looks pretty simple. Are there any comments regarding pros and cons of this method vs butane?

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael W View Post
    Vacu vin looks pretty simple. Are there any comments regarding pros and cons of this method vs butane?
    I've never use butane to preserve a bottle of wine, but have used VacuVin constantly for about 6 years. It is easy to operate and works well. Only possible con is the proprietery stoppers -- not always available, or at least I can't always find them. So buy "too many". I can't remember the cost of a VacuVin system but it is quite affordable.

  9. #39

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    They're about $20 with two stoppers.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    I use butane lighter-refill to exclude the oxygen. You must get it ALL out or the colour dev will die, even refrigerated.
    What is your process for getting the butane in the bottle then sealing it? I've bought a spray can of the stuff, cost $8, is it simply spraying into the vacant top part then sealing the bottle?

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