Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,840   Posts: 1,582,484   Online: 889
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 33 of 33
  1. #31
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,845
    Images
    29
    Stone, I'm assuming a contact printing frame. In the fifties my grandfather had a 6x9 wooden framed glass topped printing frame. First you place the paper in, then your cut negative on top, closed it up then walked out into the back yard.

    Exposure (did this as a young boy under my grandfather's eye) was simple. If it was sunny, I walked to the back fence and back with the frame on top of my head. If it was cloudy bright I did an extra half lap and my grandfather took it from me at the back fence and covered it with something, black cloth I think.

    If it was wintery cloudy, then I would walk to the back fence up to three times. Usually we did the first exposure, developed the print in the bathroom, then using that as a guide we would print off the rest of the film, which was cut into individual negatives.

    My grandfather had a Box Brownie camera, nothing flash.

    Mick.

  2. #32
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,966
    Images
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan View Post
    Stone, I'm assuming a contact printing frame. In the fifties my grandfather had a 6x9 wooden framed glass topped printing frame. First you place the paper in, then your cut negative on top, closed it up then walked out into the back yard.

    Exposure (did this as a young boy under my grandfather's eye) was simple. If it was sunny, I walked to the back fence and back with the frame on top of my head. If it was cloudy bright I did an extra half lap and my grandfather took it from me at the back fence and covered it with something, black cloth I think.

    If it was wintery cloudy, then I would walk to the back fence up to three times. Usually we did the first exposure, developed the print in the bathroom, then using that as a guide we would print off the rest of the film, which was cut into individual negatives.

    My grandfather had a Box Brownie camera, nothing flash.

    Mick.
    Sounds fun, I thought maybe there was some kind of roller that accepted an entire roll of film and you wound it to the next frame and did another exposure etc.

    Anyway now I understand.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Gerelong, Australia
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    546
    Mick they don't have an 8x10 enlarger, but they do have a Beseler 4x5.
    Molli, they don't have to pay someone to teach classes for just a very few people. It would just be me telling people what I've learned over the years and trying to convince them that they really, really do need a large format camera. LOL.
    Stone, my grandmother had a box brownie that took 122 film and the negs were very close to 4x5. I think they had either 4 or 5 shots per roll. I now have the camera but the lens elements have separated.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin