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  1. #21
    Sean's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity, what do you guys think a realistic value is for the work? There appears to be some serious overhead involved in the staging and expense of the workflow. I would think 15-20,000 would be the top end..

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I am currently working on a piece myself. It is 1 web page, it's basically all white with a single question mark dead center. This page will be available for $5,000,000 US. The museum that purchases the page will setup a computer terminal and provide the ip address of this terminal to me. It will be the only terminal in the world able to view the page. It is a one of a kind work of unprecedented rarity. Museums can conatct me via the contact link. Serious inquiries only.

    Sean
    I would think that Sean, of all people, would have a greater appreciation for the image than most. After all isn't this what you have to do, metaphorically, every day with APUG?
    Let me ask you something. If the rule you followed brought you to this, of what use was the rule?

    - Anton Chigurh

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    Just out of curiosity, what do you guys think a realistic value is for the work? There appears to be some serious overhead involved in the staging and expense of the workflow. I would think 15-20,000 would be the top end..
    It's been established that he can sell a piece like that for a million. So, whatever the market will bear. I just think the market can be nuts.

    If a guy selling a mounted and matted print for $500 has ten buck of overhead in it then that scales to a million for 20k in overhead.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by vanspaendonck View Post
    Can't help thinking back to the "Tate brick affair" of the 60's. Roger shurely will remember that one.
    The thread suddenly turned seriously bizarre. Do you conider minimalist scultures to be art? Or for that matter minimalist photographs? Do you consider anything by Carl Andre art?

    Its always fun to read people critiquing it and then getting the name wrong, or most usually not having any idea what the artist or sculture was called (or even if knowing getting it wrong). Like thinking the name ended in a 7.

  5. #25

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    I think the art market is a completely different thing to almost any other market. It combines both 'material value' and 'artistic value' into one price and really only reflects the agreement between the buyer and the seller over what the thing is worth. Trying to work out how much film, paper and chems the guy put into it and then adding a margin is useless. I bought a house recently and I know the bricks, mortar and paint are worth a lot less than what I paid for it.
    The article Mick quotes mentions Jackson Pollock's Blue Poles that was bought for $A2m in the 70s by the National Gallery of Australia and caused a public outcry with people questioning it's artistic value. There is no question these days that Blue Poles is a very very significant piece and that the NGA got a bargain. Someone offered them $US100m for it a few years back. That's about a 14% rate of return. Not too bad!
    John.

  6. #26
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    From a business point of view, there are serious financial inputs for the construction of the site, test shots, not to mention what Bob Carnie has said about his lab equipment for processing.

    If you work on a costing basis of one month of work, in the form of all the background footslogging required to put this together. Then there is the time for test shooting, developing and printing out colour corrected test prints. Add to that, the actors fees and various other people associated with the construction and deconstruction of everything, you could be looking at a realistic total valuation of $20,000 to $30,000.

    From a business point of view there should be a profit margin to allow one to re-invest in the business. This is where margins come into play, are they fair margins, or over the top margins.

    Something like a 100% margin, is pretty much at the top end of the scale in business, anything above that is cream. Taking this to a logical business perspective working on the top end of my valuation of $30,000 + 100% margin, you would be looking at $60,000. $100,000 would be well into the cream end of a business transaction.

    $1,000,000 is looking a bit like a dream come true for the artist photographer. It will certainly give him some street credibility, and, probably push other pieces of his higher up the scale.

    I will be looking forward to seeing this in the flesh.

    Mick.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan View Post
    ...Does anyone know of this photographer?

    I did google, but the information was only what I saw in our local newspaper...
    These may be of interest:

    http://www.bridgemagazine.org/online...ive/000027.php
    http://www.columbia.edu/cu/museo/3/jeffwall.htm
    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...1/ai_14376665/

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb244 View Post
    IT makes them sound more importatant to those who just see a guy untagleing ropes. And it helps to justify the purchase in their mind.

    If I remeber correctly the highest price ever paid for a 'photograph' was about 2.4 million at a Southerby's auction. Was some picture from the turn of the century on long island, NY, showing a hazy shape of the moon shining thru some trees. Course if you put that in perspective with the highest 'paintings' have gone for, 1 mil and above is not that common to see for just a photograph.
    Actually it's an original print by Weston that was auctioned and it was taken in Westchester, NY not Long Island. Best guess in Mamaroneck - I think the print dates from around 1909?.

    As to paintings, Pollacks and other post-WWII US moderns etc. now regularly go well into the tens of millions (USD) nowadays.

    I'm not sure what this whole thread is driving at except that fine arts at the highest levels command extremely high prices.

    As to back-lit chromes - I wonder whatever happened to the Kodak collection that used to be displayed on the giant backlit screen in NYC's Grand Central Station before we tossed all that visual "pollution" out of the grand old gal when we restored her to original glory?

  9. #29
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    Large, expensive, and a limited number of copies is no question. But for a living photographer to sell such an image for $1,000,000 does seem quite high. What should be a value of such an image, I can not really say.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #30

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    That is quite the knot. I like the image. Better than an a blurry image of an image.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

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