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  1. #11
    wclark5179's Avatar
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    I use mt 2 and 1 liter soda bottles. From my experiences the plastic doesn't react with photo chemicals and the cap seals it up over & over.

  2. #12
    hoffy's Avatar
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    I have used PET bottles in the past. They seem to work OK.

    I don't know about brizzy, but actually getting glass chem type bottles is not as easy as it seems locally. I did speak to a plastics manufacturor the other day. They said they had a few bits and pieces that would be suitable. I might find out what they are made of and ask here if such compounds are OK for storage.

  3. #13

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    Ok, some of you will disagree, but here's my 2c...

    Glass is obviously excellent and if almost full any effects from the air inside the bottle is likely to be negligible. On the other hand, I'd rather have something that doesn't break as easily.

    So, that leaves us plastic bottles for that purpose. There are lots of plastics and some are more air penetrable than others. I was given an accordion bottle, but soon I realised that it expanded to it's maximum volume. The cap was anything but airtight.

    I started using bottles that had carbonated drinks. They had "PET" stamped on them. The good thing about them, compared to others used for water, is that they have an elastic flange at the cap. If tightly capped they should be airtight. Soon I discovered that it's true.

    I put some paper developer in one of them (working solution, Ilford MG, 1+9). The next day the bottle had shrunk. That must be a sign that the developer had reacted with the oxygen in the bottle(1). So, the volume of the oxygen lost was not replaced by air outside the bottle. A very good sign that it was airtight.

    After that, I found a propane/butane bottle, that kind that is used to fill lighters. It won't react with the developer (Tetenal Protectan is more or less the same), but it certainly is flammable. So, I thought about displacing air with that.

    I gave it a try and I'm pleased. When spraying that gas into the bottle, it's temperature is much lower than the ambient. Therefore, it will sooner or later expand as it's heated. So, after an hour or so, I loosened the cap a bit and let the "excess" gas leak, just like when opening a bottle of a carbonated drink (2). Two days later I checked the bottle again. No shrinking! The bottle didn't feel pressurised at all and when opening it I didn't hear anything leaking either.

    So, it seems to me that it's a cheap way to store chemicals. The only risk involved is the gas, but have a look at the ingredients of any spray and you'll notice that they all have propane/butane...

    (1) As opposed to the stop bath and fixer bottles. They were tightly capped as well, but their volume remained as it was.

    (2) If the pressure in the bottle is high you can't say if there was something in there that reacted with the developer. The bottle's volume will still be the same.

  4. #14
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    OK, stupid question, but here goes: Does the *color* of the glass bottle matter? I want to store Xtol developer and Kodak Fixer and have 2 2-liter medium dark green (but not opaque) bottles. They are seem like they would be perfect for storage, but i'm completely new to this.

    HELP!!!!!!!!!!

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Recently PE posted that if the bottles are stored in a cool dark place, any color glass, including clear, is acceptable for storing chemicals.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    fmajor's Avatar
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    HA!!!! I *just* read that! Thanks Sirius!

  7. #17
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I use the brown bottles that hydrogen peroxide come in. here in the states they come in 1 pint and 1 quart sizes. The quart ones run less than $2 with contents(most times I just dump them)Also I watch for 2 for 1 sales - they get real affordable then. After a good washout with scalding I let them air dry for a day or so. I also use vinegar jugs for the gallon size. Rubbing alcohol bottles work as well.
    Rick

  8. #18

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    Wine Storage

    I think you have to store your bottles to any storage company.

    Wine Storage

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