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  1. #1

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    Process ECN-2 for Pictorial Use

    Title: Process ECN-2 for Pictorial Use

    Purpose:

    To demonstrate that color motion picture film can be used for pictorial use.

    To present a variation of process ECN-2 for the creation of still negatives.

    Procedure:

    ECN-2 negative film can be gotten for very reasonable prices as short ends but there doesn't seem to be any information about using it for pictorial use, except that it probably a bad idea. Further the ones that want to do it seem intent on using C-41 chemicals instead of the ECN-2 chemicals. Thus producing negatives of less than archival quality even though the formulas for process ECN-2 are published.

    The color developer was adapted from its original published form to reflect what I had available and what I could get a hold of for instance Kodak Anti-calcium was removed from the formula and antifoggant AF2000 was also removed as I couldn't source these two chemicals. This necessitated the use of distilled water. Also potassium bromide was substituted for sodium bromide as it was easier to obtain and is less expensive. The stop bath made use of acetic acid instead of sulfuric acid, the fixer was Arista Arifix. It also appears that Kodak has removed formaldehyde from all photographic processes including process ECN-2. After careful reading of the MSDS it was concluded that the chemicals in Final Rinse was the same as what was being offered for process ECN-2.

    After warming the water to appropriate temperatures the chemicals were mixed as specified in the formulas section.

    Temperature control was achieved by the drift by method were the temperature drop during the color developer step was determined then the change in temperature was divided in half and added to the recommended start temperature. In my case I experienced a drop of 7°F so 7°F/2=3.5. Starting temperature is 103.5°F. Developing time was standard C-41 time of 3.5 minuets. Similar C-41 times was used for the stop, bleach, fix and finial rinse with appropriate rinses between stop and bleach, fix and final rinse.

    The rem-jet antihaliation backing was not removed until after the end of the process. After the final rinse step a cotton pad like those for the removal of makeup was used to remove the backing quite easily.

    Formulas:

    COLOR DEVELOPER
    Distilled Water 21 to 38°C (70 to 100°F)
    850mL
    Sodium Sulfite (Anhydrous)
    2.0g
    Potassium Bromide (Anhydrous)
    1.4g
    Sodium Carbonate (Anhydrous)
    25.6g
    Sodium Bicarbonate
    2.7g
    CD-3
    4.0g
    Distilled Water to make
    1L

    STOP
    Water
    964mL
    Acetic Acid 28%
    36mL

    BLEACH
    Distilled Water 32 to 43°C (90 to 110°F)
    900mL
    Potassium Ferricyanide (Anhydrous)
    40.0g
    Potassium Bromide (Anhydrous)
    29.0g
    Distilled Water to make
    1L

    Results:

    The motion picture film used was Kodak 5205 a Vision-2 250 daylight balanced film shot at an EI of 225. The still film used was Fujifilm Super HQ 200. A amature film was used since the film being compared against is being used outside its intended use. The C-41 negatives were developed and printed on a Fuji Frontier at a local Wal-Mart on Crystal Archive paper the ECN-2 Negatives were developed myself and then printed at the local Wal-Mart using the same machine and paper.

    These photographs were taken during overcast weather. The Fuji negatives appear to have been exposed on a bright sunny day with the over saturation and blown highlights associated with this film/paper combination. I shudder to think what this would look like on a bright sunny day. The prints from the ECN-2 negatives have less saturation than the Fuji negatives, but that is another way of saying that the ECN-2 negatives have a more accurate color reproduction compared to the Fuji negatives. Also highlights aren't blown as they are in the Fuji negatives.

    Conclusion:

    ECN-2 films can be used for pictorial purposes and that the ECN-2 process can be adapted for normal darkroom use.

  2. #21

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    Thank you guiver

    I have had a roll (bulk) of 5247 sitting in my fridge for about 8 months now and have been searching for a usable processing solution for this since finding out it was different from the usual C-41, I've now ordered the required chemistry from silverprint and hope to post results of my experiments here soon! thanks for the formulas!

    ta
    pete

  3. #22

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    I putzed with the movie films in C-41 chemistry 20 years ago. I can't tell you about densitometer results, but to the eye the looked just fine. I had been using one of those movie film slide plus prints outfits in North Hollywood. I just wanted to see if C-41 could do it.

    The rem-jet backing just falls away even using your finger across the film. A followup with tissue or cotton is needed.

    Of course, no one can print this stuff except those specialized houses because of the different masking, it's much redder.

    Prints made from this stuff lack contrast and saturation. It is meant to be "printed" to the appropriate 35mm film. Those slides were just fine.

  4. #23

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    Tried both the described process and c-41 development on ecn-2 film.

    The reason i had to do the development was to test an old Bolex 16mm camera that i am using for a stop motion project. Since i am shooting on Kodak vision 3, 500T i used a strip of this film for testing purposes. The scanning was done on an Imacon Flextight 848
    I have now tried both c-41(in a automatic jobo machine) and the described ecn-2 (in a fully manual Lomo tank) recipe on kodak vision 3, 500T, and I must say that for testing exposure and focus, both methods worked. Rem-jet was removed after the last wash, but before final rinse.

    For the ecn-2 process every step of the recipe was followed except:

    I could not get hold of CD-3 in powdered form, so i chose to use the color developer part B supplied with kodak E-6 kits. I believe they contain the same chemicals but i am not 100% sure. I used 50 ml of this for one liter, and therefore used 50 ml less of distilled water.

    I only had Acetic Acid 85,5%, so i used 12,5ml of this and filled up with water to make 1 Liter.

    During the mixing i used different measuring glasses for each chemical and in overall followed Kodaks advice on solution mixing supplied in their manual for ecn-2 processing: http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/h2407.pdf

    The processing was done using kodaks description for sink line processing c-4:1 http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/...ls/z131_03.pdf

    but with addition of the stop bath which i guesstimated from the ecn-2 processing manual to be 2 minutes (but maybe this was to little?).

    Unfortunately the finished precessed film suffered from a slight Prussian blue (cyanish) tint, but not to such a degree that it couldn't be corrected in photoshop after scanning. A slight lack of contrast, compared to normal c-41 film was also noticed.

    I believe the Prussian blue tint could have come from to little or to much? washing after the stop and that the pH of the bleach went below 6.0 because of this .

    The result was good enough to check exposure,etc, and confirm that the camera was working, and (just for fun) printing out some of the pictures that were color corrected in photoshop.

    I believe the resulting negatives would not be satisfactory for darkroom paper printing , because of the Prussian blue tint, and a slight lack of contrast.

    Processing the film in c-41 chemicals in a jobo machine did no harm to the equipment (but maybe because it was just a 50 cm strip) or the film, and actually gave better results than the ecn-2 process, but i have no idea how the negatives will manage over time. But I will claim that for just equipment testing, c-41 process is the simplest and the best. Just remember to remove the rem-jet from the film and clean it properly during the final wash.

  5. #24
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    Lex;

    The E6 color developer contains a hefty batch of sulfite which would reduce contrast in the film. In addition, the pH might be wrong. ECN film is built to have a lower contrast than professional and consumer color negative films, and is built for optimum printing dye hues with CD3 not CD4. So, all in all, it was a gamble and you got usable results.

    PE

  6. #25
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    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum172/...ide-films.html

    Discussion of getting ECN-II Processing.... take a look

  7. #26

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    This is a rather interesting thread, as im interested to look at shooting this if E6 dies.
    Can anyone here post a pic of a developed ECN2 negative?
    I cant find any images of it anywhere, but am interested to see one, as i expect they look quite different without the orange mask on C41 films....

  8. #27

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    I know that this thread is probably dead, but just to clarify is there a fixing step required?

  9. #28

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    Nvm, just reread op.

  10. #29

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    Yes, there is a fixing step.

  11. #30
    AgX
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    The title of this article is not well-chosen, as ECN-2 film is intended for pictorial use too.
    The differences between motion ECN-2 film and still-C-41 film aside of processing chemicals have been laid out above.

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