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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Ilford PQ variants of ID-11 (D76)

    Most of the MQ variations of D76 are published widely, but less is known about the PQ variants of Ilford's equivalent developer ID-11

    Although J.D. Kendall of Ilford discovered and patented Phenidone (1-Phenyl-3-Pyrazolidone) in 1941 it was 11 years before the first packaged products containing it went on sale.

    Many of these first developers were simply Phenidone based versions of MQ developers, typical examples are ID-20 PQ and ID-36 PQ, and research into other possible developer combinations & formulae continued.

    In 1954 Ilford published the first formulae in The British Journal of Photography stating "As Phenidone is now generally available in bulk packings ranging from ¼-oz. to 4-lb., it is felt that the publication of a number of formulae in which this new developing agent is used in combination with hydroquinone will be useful to those workers who wish to compound their own developers".

    These developers were:
    ID-62 - a PQ variant of ID-20
    A very similar developer for Contact prints - (identical except the Potassium Bromide is cut to 0.25g/litre)
    ID-67 - a PQ variant of ID-2
    Fine Grain Developer for plates and films - a PQ variant of ID-11 - the formula below.


    Fine grain developer for plates and films (1954)

    Sodium sulphite (anhydrous) 100 gm.
    Hydroquinone 5 gm.
    Borax 2 gm.
    Boric acid 1 gm.
    Potassium bromide 1 gm.
    Phenidone 0.2 gm
    Water to make 1 litre

    Development time: 7-11 minutes at 68° F.

    This developer has characteristics approximating to those of Ilford ID-ll, but shows less change in activity during use.


    This PQ version of ID-11 was taken further by A.J.Axford & J.D.Kendall who published a version with slightly different buffering for commercial processing, and they included two types of replenisher.



    ID-68 was a reformulation of the Fine Grain PQ developer to give better film speed and is similar to Microphen, in Ilford's words "Phenidone as used in the formula below gives remarkably high emulsion speed with fine grain (approximately to ID-11 standards) with development times of 10-15 minutes at 68° F.
    This developer shows exceptionally small change of activity with use." Also "Development times as for Microphen"

    ID-68
    Ilford Phenidone-Hydroquinone Fine grain Developer


    Sodium sulphite (anhydrous) 85 gm.
    Hydroquinone 5 gm.
    Borax 7 gm.
    Boric acid 2 gm.
    Phenidone 0.13 gm.
    Potassium bromide 1 gm.
    Water to make 1 litre

    This developer may be used undiluted.
    "Development times as for Microphen"

    Here is a comparison of ID-11 (D76) and the Ilford PQ Fine grain developers:



    Axford & Kendall's Commercial "PQ Fine Grain Developer" formula has been incorrectly described as being of "Microphen type" in books and websites like Silvergrain, it is just a differently buffered version of the PQ ID-11 type developer Ilford published in 1954.

    Ian Grant 2008
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 07-25-2008 at 08:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    The latest Ilford variants are DD (Dip & Dunk) developer and DD-X which are the nearest so far to a liquid concentrated version Microphen.
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...2033292749.pdf

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    DD & DDX aren't PQ variants of ID-11, like ID-68 & Microphen they are new formulations.

  4. #4
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Ian, I have been using Ilford's Universal PQ developer for FP4+ with nice results (for pt/pd and carbon printing)..not quite sure where it falls into place with the formulas you listed above.

    vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    No PQ Universal is quite different, it's not designed to be a fine grain formula. However diluted 1+19 or 1+29 it will give excellent results on most films, very good fine grain and tonality.

    May & Baker's Suprol was always slightly better.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    snipHowever diluted 1+19 or 1+29 it will give excellent results on most films, very good fine grain and tonality.
    Ian
    Thanks...that is the range of dilution I have been using it at (Jobo drum/motor base). With contact printing, I have not worried too much about grain size.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #7
    BradS's Avatar
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    Ian, Thanks for doing this research and sharing the results here.

    I've used ID-68. Somewhere, I also found a replenisher. It is a very nice developer. Works great with HP-5+ rated at EI-800. Still, if it is available, I tend to prefer Acufine in this case.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Replenisher for ID-68

    ID68 R

    Sodium sulphite (anhydrous) 85 gm.
    Hydroquinone 8 gm.
    Borax 10 gm.
    Phenidone 0.22 gm.
    Water to make 1 litre

    Ian

  9. #9

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    A friend of mine studied at Plymouth College Of Art & Design in the late 70`s. The B&W film developers were Kodak D-76 and Ilford Microphen. D-76 was by far the favourite developer of the photography students.

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I have to agree I've always preferred ID-11 to Microphen or ID-68 for normal use.

    However before XP1 & 2 were released I regularly shot Rock concerts using HP5 at 1600 or 3200 ISO and then Microphen/ID-68 came into its own, it was substantially better.

    The two PQ variants of ID-11 aren't like Microphen/ID-68 which has been tweaked to give the extra speed boost by cutting the Sulphite, which also leads to the slightly more pronounce grain.

    Some people like that slightly gritty edge that Microphen/ID-68 gives.

    Ian

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