Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,636   Posts: 1,648,283   Online: 1119
      
Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 95
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Seaford,UK South Coast
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4

    Going back to real photography

    I am on the brink of returning to my darkroom,the dark, the developers and the smell of fixer. Digital is magic and can result in stunning pictures but they are not the product of my skill. I will never forget my first print emerging in the tray, and my first good print some time later.
    I am in awe of the vast knowledge of subscribers on this site and wonder why they stick to this peculiar, messy long winded method of making pictures ?

  2. #61

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Clover, SC
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    24
    This has been a fascinating read for me. I'm just getting started with photography, aside from point and shoot stuff. I've done a great deal of reading and thinking, and digital really has no allure for me. Like others here, I work on a computer all day (software development), and can't really look forward to using one for a hobby. I'm hoping to be developing my own b&w film in a couple months, and printing in a darkroom by this time next year.

    I have no problem with digital cameras, photographs, or photographers. To each his own. I look forward to seeing what I can do with a camera, film, etc. I have no interest in using Photoshop (et al) as a part of that process.

    Pete

  3. #62

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    aberystwyth west wales uk
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    120
    for me digital is a great tool but film is an art plus the cost of a dslr is stupid

    plus i do love putting the film in and so on however i cant get the HD images i could with my digital i had
    but i think thats more me than camera

    i think that digital makes you lazy in a way as you can take 500 shots and then delete the rubbish ones

    with film you take more time to pick your shot and think more about what your shooting for me
    the best way i can describe it is its like being a lord of time i can freeze it take a moment that will never ever be seen again

    a cloud a sunset a bird and when i look at others old photos im going back in time and seeing what that person see

    for me its like magic now i have said this before and an old photographer said im a natural photographer lol dont know if thats true but as long as i can get 35mm film ill use it

    im 35 and iv grown up with tech but the magic of the 35mm film camera is still a powerful spell
    Leave nothing but footprints.Kill nothing but time.

  4. #63
    Portellini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Oeiras, Lisbon, Portugal
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1
    Well, I don't use the darkroom. Never bothered to learn traditional . I worked in a lab for 4 years and learned a lot about the automated process. Nevertheless, I tried once the darkroom stuff and found it boring. What I love about photography and specially analog is that you just need a film roll and an ancient camera to produce stunning pictures. Cameras that most people will throw away. I discovered this when I began to see manual film cameras like Canon A-1 and Nikon FM being sold for 60 euros, the equivalent for 40 bucks.

    True lovers of photography find the magic to understand the craft of producing images with old equipment. Automated cameras, although they're effective to produce work that needs to be done quickly (such as my Mamiya 645 AF), there is no doubt that an ancient camera is a magical tool nowadays.

  5. #64

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,696
    Images
    15
    Film photography in any shape or form, from 35mm to ULF relies on experience, judgement and skill to obtain the results you want using an holistic approch: visual arrangement, conception, processing and printing; you know what you want, can place the result within several matrices of probability and likelihood and feel confident about achieving the result — all through a vast storehouse of experience that only film can provide. Too many digimons (who have no foundation knowledge in traditional photography) do not grasp this and insist, often very loudly, that they are better photographers (etc, etc.). I have long since given up trying to get the message across with them firing back Church of Scientology-style, "film died long ago, do you hear me, get a life!". Pffft—!

  6. #65
    Black Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,805
    Yes, I've encountered that attitude SO many times....maybe it's a sign of insecurity..
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  7. #66
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,860
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    Why do great guitar players "stick to" 50 year old Strats and tube amps?
    Because they are crazy! The hollow body is the king of the electric guitar - preferably with Gretsch on the headstock!

    I find it quite strange that despite being a builder of valve (tube) based audio equipment, my normal gigging amplifier is a Line 6 solid state amp with tons of software to make it sound like a collection of classic valve amps. It is actually very good but I am currently building a small valve amplifier to use for smaller gigs to re-dress the balance.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #67
    Black Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,805
    I hope it goes up to 11?
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  9. #68

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    British Columbia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    10
    Blog Entries
    2
    Ah yes the of fixer. I own and operate an accommodation business in the summer, but when things slow down in our off season I feel the pull to my darkroom and creating art. Digital certainly has its place, but for me real photography is in the darkroom. I stick to this "messy long winded method of making pictures" because it is my passion. There is always so much to learn, so much to experiment with and so much magic happens in the darkroom.

  10. #69

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    British Columbia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    10
    Blog Entries
    2
    Haha love it!

  11. #70

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1

    you will know

    I found this page today while I was doing an inventory of my old cameras and photography equipment with the idea that I would put all the stuff on ebay.
    I have not used the equipment for years, it's dusty, and it takes up space.
    I wondered "Can my digital camera (the one from which the batteries are always either lost or dead, the one from which my crashed hard drive images or scratched disks are lost) do just as good as my cumbersome SLR and darkroom? Feeling philosophical I looked on-line for the value of traditional photography.

    I live to tinker. I thought about an old "59 English Ford I had with a 4 cylinder flathead with bad rod bearings. and the discussion I had with a mechanic about whether or not a 1978 Pinto engine would fit. "Sure", he said, "You can make it fit - but you'll know it's the wrong engine." He said, "Find a way to fix the original."

    Today I remembered my college photography classes, my old, damp basement darkroom back in the day, and the pride I got from from the final results of my K1000 and that rickety old enlarger. I still have those black and white photographs, and although they might not be masterpieces, they do have a "real" look and feel.

    I found this site, read some posts, wrote this response, and got my questions answered - and besides, most of my old stuff ain't worth a whole lot of cash.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin