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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    J.W.Shaw - Hydroquinone p-Aminophenol Developer

    Warm Toned Print developer. (Using Rodinal)

    Solution A

    Hydroquinone 16.7 g
    Sodium Sulphite 91 g
    Citric Acid 6.25 g
    Potassium Bromide 3.12 g
    Water to 1 litre

    Solution B

    Sodium Hydroxide 16.7 g
    Water to 1 litre

    Solution C Potassium Bromide Solution 10% (!00 g/litre)


    To Use:
    24 ml Soln A
    24 ml Soln B
    1 ml Rodinal (Agfa)
    12 ml Soln C
    100 ml Water

    Originally formulated for lantern slides this developer works well with warm tone papers.

    This is slightly different to the previously posted version.

  2. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Not too high for Warm tone papers though especually with that level of Hydroxide, after all Lith devs used for lith printing can contain even more Bromide

    Ian

  3. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Not too high for Warm tone papers though especually with that level of Hydroxide, after all Lith devs used for lith printing can contain even more Bromide

    Ian
    I don't disagree. My original post referred to the use of modern chloride papers or high chloride papers which may not react well with this developer.

    PE

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    That high level of sulfite and high level of bromide might do some nasty things to modern chloride papers. IDK for sure, but I would suggest a test first. It would certainly be good with Bromide or Br/I materials.
    FWIW, I gave this formula a try today with three papers. My initial reason for trying it was that I've got some Kodak Polycontrast III RC paper purchased from Photo Warehouse a year or two ago that's in pretty bad shape. I was hoping that a different developer from my usual (Suzuki's DS-14) might help. It didn't, but the developer didn't work any worse than DS-14. I also used it with some fresh Ilford MG-IV and some old but useable Kodak Elite Fine Art S2, and it was fine with both of them.

    I honestly don't know which, if any, of these are "modern chloride papers." The developer developed images on all the papers with no obvious problems, aside from those already noted with the Polycontrast III, and I've seen that with every developer I've tried it with. I believe this developer produced warmer tones with the Ilford, and maybe the Kodak Elite, than I see with DS-14, but the prints aren't yet completely dry and I've not yet done a side-by-side comparison.

  5. #14
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    Very good to know.

    I was just putting up a precautionary note. Better to be safe than sorry.

    Thanks.

    PE

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