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  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    HC110 made simple.

    I thought I had posted this to the articles a long time ago, but I guess I didn't. So for the archives and the children, here it is.

    I like Hc110. Especially for roll film. I don't like the convoluted "working
    solution" dilutions and sub dilutions, or the short times some of the dilutions
    and sub dilutions create. It should be simple to use Hc110, like Rodinal.

    If you care to research, there was a method to Kodaks madness when they
    created the dilutions and routines for HC110, but they are of little
    convenience for the darkroom enthusiast. I get more questions about
    mixing and developing with HC110 than all other developers combined. It is
    a great developer that doesn't need to be complex in usage, so I concocted a
    metric dilution that goes by 50 (1+49) That means you use 1 ml of HC110 for
    every 49 ml of water in a direct from the concentrate dilution.

    Here is how to use it on roll film in an inversion tank, like Rodinal:

    First of all, forget about saving and replenishing it. Mix up what you need, use
    it, and dump it. It's so cheap under normal usage that saving it is fairly
    useless from a cost savings perspective, plus consistent performance is
    assured by using it one-shot.

    Next, forget about an intermediate working solution. Mix it directly from the
    concentrate. Use a small bottle and a baby syringe (available at any drug
    store) to mix directly from the concentrate. Simply mix it 1+49 . Use the times
    below as a starting guide (you may not expose the same as me, or may not
    have the same taste in negatives, so these are only suggestions that should
    get you in the ballpark to do your own tweeking)

    So without further ado,

    Hc110 direct from concentrate-1+49 , 68f 20c, agitate first 30s with 2
    inversions every 30s thereafter.

    ****Note to the civilized-Please keep in mind that this methodology is for the
    US version of the concentrate*****

    Acros100 @ 100 - 8 min
    Efke 25 @ 20 - 10.5 min
    Efke100 @ 100 - 10 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 64 - 9 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 125 - 11 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 400 - 8 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 800 - 11.5 min
    Plus X @ 125 - 8 min
    Tmax100 @ 100 - 9 min
    Tmax400 @ 400 - 9 min
    TriX320 @ 320 -8 min
    TriX400 @ 400 - 8 min

    The following was provided by photographer David William White:

    Arista EDU-Ultra 100 @ 100 - 6.5 min
    Ilford Pan F+ @ 50 - 5.5 min

  2. #21

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    Thanks for the info! I'm going to use HC-110 more often.

    Jeff

  3. #22

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    I'm really not clear what problem you're trying to solve. Making a 1:49 dilution doesn't make anything easier than a 1:31 or 1:63 or 1:119 dilution, as far as I can tell?
    The camera is the most incidental element of photography.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by okto View Post
    I'm really not clear what problem you're trying to solve. Making a 1:49 dilution doesn't make anything easier than a 1:31 or 1:63 or 1:119 dilution, as far as I can tell?
    Sure it does, it makes the math a heck of a lot easier, I use HC110 Dilution S (for Stone) of 1:25 because 1:31 gives me a headache trying to calculate the increases for each film. Maybe I'm a simpleton, but 1:50/1:25/1:100 are much easier to calculate.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #24

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    I also use HC-110 at 1+49 which works superbly with the metric system. For my SS tank which holds 250 ml I use 5 ml of concentrate. As a plus I also use Rodinal at the same dilution. Makes life a lot simpler.

    I use a 10 ml measuring cylinder and the viscosity of the concentrate doesn't bother me. As far as baby medicine syringes are concerned they are not very accurate and should be checked.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-29-2013 at 04:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #25
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    I use a 10 ml baby syringe, fill it to the line and squirt it into enough water to hit the 500 ml line on the measuring cup. Easy peasy 1+49.

    Is it a huge difference from 1+63? Probably not but easier to make. More importantly you skip the intermediate working dilution recommended by Kodak.

  7. #26
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    500mL is sensible for those shooting 120, but I think 320mL is what a Paterson tank requires for 35mm. So 1+31 makes sense for 35mm shooters...

  8. #27
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    I thought the point of the "made simple" part of the article was to mix it as a 1-shot rather than following the directions on the bottle for making up "stock" and then diluting again. Like everyone here, I use a 10ml syringe, mine came from a pet store, for giving medicine. My tank for 35 mm is 240ml and I use 6ml syrup to make dilution "d". For 120, my tank is 480ml and I use 10ml to make dilution "e". For stand and semi-stand I also use dilution "m" ( for "Mike" who is Blia100 over at flickr ) which is 1:250, or for me 2ml syrup and 480ml water ( and yes it does develop after an hour even though the "common wisdom" is that 6ml is the minimal required... )

    1 more thing, I do see value in sticking to one dilution, at least for each film type. It's taken a while to dial in my favorite times for each of these. If I started using a different dilution, I'd have to start that process over again!

  9. #28
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    I have used HC-110 for about 10 years now, mixing directly from syrup, and I really like it. Once you get used to pouring the stuff into a small graduate, it is really easy. I pour the syrup into the graduate, being very careful to ensure that I do not hit the sides, which will throw off the measurement because of the viscosity of the syrup. I also make sure to rinse out the graduate with the water I am adding, at least 4-5 times to make sure I am getting all the syrup. The hypodermic method suggested by Covington works well too.

    The only problem I had with it was in my Jobo for zone system development with sheet film. In order to keep the development time from creeping under five or even four minutes, for N-1 and N-2, I had to go to higher dilutions. Not a problem, except that the Jobo only holds so much and I don't think the motor likes the tank filled right up. I now use Expert Drums without the processor (hand rolled in my darkroom sink) and that method allows me to use highly dilute solutions, like F (1:79).

    I have never been able to find anything from Kodak which indicates clearly the minimum amount of syrup per unit of film, so here is how I figure it. The Kodak data sheet says that one gallon of dilution B will process 10 sheets of 8x10 film. One gallon is 3785 ml so one gallon of diliution B would contain (3785ml / 31 + 1 ) = 118.28 ml of developer, which develops 10 sheets of 8x10. So one sheet of 8x10 would require 11.8 ml, rounded off to 12 ml. One 4x5 sheet would thus require 3 ml. I once calculated the surface area of a roll of 120 film but I can't remember how I did it. In any case, based on that now-missing arithmetic, I used 6 ml per roll of 120 film. I suppose I could just measure a developed roll!

  10. #29
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The Kodak data sheet (J24) says, when processing in tanks, one litre of dilution B has the capacity to process five 8 x 10 sheets.

    The capacity figures quoted above are for tray processing.

    One litre of dilution B means includes 30 ml of concentrate, so 6 ml of concentrate have the capacity to process one 8 x 10 sheet.

    One 8 x 10 sheet = one 135 - 36 roll = one 120 roll.

    So your 6 ml per roll of 120 makes sense.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  11. #30
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    I have used HC-110 for about 10 years now, mixing directly from syrup, and I really like it. Once you get used to pouring the stuff into a small graduate, it is really easy. I pour the syrup into the graduate, being very careful to ensure that I do not hit the sides, which will throw off the measurement because of the viscosity of the syrup. I also make sure to rinse out the graduate with the water I am adding, at least 4-5 times to make sure I am getting all the syrup. The hypodermic method suggested by Covington works well too.

    The only problem I had with it was in my Jobo for zone system development with sheet film. In order to keep the development time from creeping under five or even four minutes, for N-1 and N-2, I had to go to higher dilutions. Not a problem, except that the Jobo only holds so much and I don't think the motor likes the tank filled right up. I now use Expert Drums without the processor (hand rolled in my darkroom sink) and that method allows me to use highly dilute solutions, like F (1:79).

    I have never been able to find anything from Kodak which indicates clearly the minimum amount of syrup per unit of film, so here is how I figure it. The Kodak data sheet says that one gallon of dilution B will process 10 sheets of 8x10 film. One gallon is 3785 ml so one gallon of diliution B would contain (3785ml / 31 + 1 ) = 118.28 ml of developer, which develops 10 sheets of 8x10. So one sheet of 8x10 would require 11.8 ml, rounded off to 12 ml. One 4x5 sheet would thus require 3 ml. I once calculated the surface area of a roll of 120 film but I can't remember how I did it. In any case, based on that now-missing arithmetic, I used 6 ml per roll of 120 film. I suppose I could just measure a developed roll!
    This is why the idea of 1:49 was created, it's already complicated enough haha


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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