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  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    HC110 made simple.

    I thought I had posted this to the articles a long time ago, but I guess I didn't. So for the archives and the children, here it is.

    I like Hc110. Especially for roll film. I don't like the convoluted "working
    solution" dilutions and sub dilutions, or the short times some of the dilutions
    and sub dilutions create. It should be simple to use Hc110, like Rodinal.

    If you care to research, there was a method to Kodaks madness when they
    created the dilutions and routines for HC110, but they are of little
    convenience for the darkroom enthusiast. I get more questions about
    mixing and developing with HC110 than all other developers combined. It is
    a great developer that doesn't need to be complex in usage, so I concocted a
    metric dilution that goes by 50 (1+49) That means you use 1 ml of HC110 for
    every 49 ml of water in a direct from the concentrate dilution.

    Here is how to use it on roll film in an inversion tank, like Rodinal:

    First of all, forget about saving and replenishing it. Mix up what you need, use
    it, and dump it. It's so cheap under normal usage that saving it is fairly
    useless from a cost savings perspective, plus consistent performance is
    assured by using it one-shot.

    Next, forget about an intermediate working solution. Mix it directly from the
    concentrate. Use a small bottle and a baby syringe (available at any drug
    store) to mix directly from the concentrate. Simply mix it 1+49 . Use the times
    below as a starting guide (you may not expose the same as me, or may not
    have the same taste in negatives, so these are only suggestions that should
    get you in the ballpark to do your own tweeking)

    So without further ado,

    Hc110 direct from concentrate-1+49 , 68f 20c, agitate first 30s with 2
    inversions every 30s thereafter.

    ****Note to the civilized-Please keep in mind that this methodology is for the
    US version of the concentrate*****

    Acros100 @ 100 - 8 min
    Efke 25 @ 20 - 10.5 min
    Efke100 @ 100 - 10 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 64 - 9 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 125 - 11 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 400 - 8 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 800 - 11.5 min
    Plus X @ 125 - 8 min
    Tmax100 @ 100 - 9 min
    Tmax400 @ 400 - 9 min
    TriX320 @ 320 -8 min
    TriX400 @ 400 - 8 min

    The following was provided by photographer David William White:

    Arista EDU-Ultra 100 @ 100 - 6.5 min
    Ilford Pan F+ @ 50 - 5.5 min

  2. #31

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    My understanding is that the only currently available packaging is in 1 liter, which is not the same concentration as the original US packaging (493 ml or something like that). I still have a full bottle of the latter, and had been using it at the "unofficial" dilution H (1:63) which is twice the dilution of B. That has worked well enough for me, and I'll probably just stick to that as it takes me a bit further especially on 120 film where one needs a larger developer volume. If you work on 550 ml at 1:49, it will require 11 ml of concentrate, twice what is technically necessary per film. The obvious solution is to load two rolls onto one Paterson reel, which is entirely possible, but that means having to hoard films that require the same developing time. At dil H 10 ml gives me 640 ml of developer, and saves me a few drops of precious developer. It is very expensive to import liquids, so every drop helps.

    For most films, HC-110 gives me a very similar result to Rodinal. However, Rollei RPX400 and Kentmere 400 fog something terrible in Rodinal, and are miles better in HC-110. I suspect that it might be true for some other emulsions also.

  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Sure it does, it makes the math a heck of a lot easier, I use HC110 Dilution S (for Stone) of 1:25 because 1:31 gives me a headache trying to calculate the increases for each film. Maybe I'm a simpleton, but 1:50/1:25/1:100 are much easier to calculate.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    Depends on whether you work in metric or english system. I use whichever is easiest for the dilution I'm using! So for 1+31 I'd use an ounce of concentrate to make a quart of solution.

  4. #33
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    My understanding is that the only currently available packaging is in 1 liter, which is not the same concentration as the original US packaging (493 ml or something like that). I still have a full bottle of the latter, and had been using it at the "unofficial" dilution H (1:63) which is twice the dilution of B. That has worked well enough for me, and I'll probably just stick to that as it takes me a bit further especially on 120 film where one needs a larger developer volume. If you work on 550 ml at 1:49, it will require 11 ml of concentrate, twice what is technically necessary per film. The obvious solution is to load two rolls onto one Paterson reel, which is entirely possible, but that means having to hoard films that require the same developing time. At dil H 10 ml gives me 640 ml of developer, and saves me a few drops of precious developer. It is very expensive to import liquids, so every drop helps.

    For most films, HC-110 gives me a very similar result to Rodinal. However, Rollei RPX400 and Kentmere 400 fog something terrible in Rodinal, and are miles better in HC-110. I suspect that it might be true for some other emulsions also.
    I thought I read that it IS the same concentration, just in a larger bottle.

    Can someone confirm one way or the other?

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I thought I read that it IS the same concentration, just in a larger bottle.

    Can someone confirm one way or the other?
    I have this 1l bottle, been using it as it is American concentration: on HP5+ it gives perfect negatives with devchart times (dilution B and H).

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The Kodak data sheet (J24) says, when processing in tanks, one litre of dilution B has the capacity to process five 8 x 10 sheets.

    The capacity figures quoted above are for tray processing.

    One litre of dilution B means includes 30 ml of concentrate, so 6 ml of concentrate have the capacity to process one 8 x 10 sheet.

    One 8 x 10 sheet = one 135 - 36 roll = one 120 roll.

    So your 6 ml per roll of 120 makes sense.
    Matt, I am glad I posted. I have always found that section of the data sheet a little confusing but what you say makes sense. At least I have not been using too little. But what about 4x5? This would mean each 4x5 sheet requires 1/4 as much, or only 1.5 ml per sheet! This is getting close to "development by faith alone." If that is the case, then it will have a big impact on just how much I have to load up the Jobo drums. This is good news.

    On the other hand, it now seems like I have enough HC-110 to bequeath to my grandsons. I hope they don't just drink it.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    Matt, I am glad I posted. I have always found that section of the data sheet a little confusing but what you say makes sense. At least I have not been using too little. But what about 4x5? This would mean each 4x5 sheet requires 1/4 as much, or only 1.5 ml per sheet! This is getting close to "development by faith alone." If that is the case, then it will have a big impact on just how much I have to load up the Jobo drums. This is good news.

    On the other hand, it now seems like I have enough HC-110 to bequeath to my grandsons. I hope they don't just drink it.
    Don't forget, that 1.5 ml of concentrate per sheet means just 48 ml of dilution B per sheet.

    For this to be meaningful for developing a single sheet, you need a tank that will ensure even immersion and development flow with just 48 ml of developer - I don't think that such a beast exists.

    By necessity, with 4 x 5 film you need to either develop multiple sheets at the same time, or use more than the minimum amount of developer.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #37

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    For a particular film: 1 36 exp 35mm roll = 120 roll = 1 8x10 sheet as far as silver content.

    If you do the calculation 5 ml of HC-110 concentrate is more than enough developer to correctly develop one of the three choices above.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #38

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    Oh, I was already mixing mine one-shot with a syringe. I assumed everyone else had read the Covington Innovations HC-110 page too.

    I just have the dilutions memorized for the tanks I use at this point. Dil B is 9 in 300mL per roll in a Paterson tank, 14 in 450mL for the daylight-loading Jobo. Dil A is twice that, dil H is half.

    Do other people have a gaggle of different tank sizes they use, or bounce around all over the dilution scale?
    The camera is the most incidental element of photography.

  10. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    If you do the calculation 5 ml of HC-110 concentrate is more than enough developer to correctly develop one of the three choices above.
    Kodak data says a minimum of 6mL syrup per film for consistent development.
    The camera is the most incidental element of photography.

  11. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by okto View Post
    Kodak data says a minimum of 6mL syrup per film for consistent development.
    Kodak is very conservative in its recommendations. I have been using 5 ml per roll for many years and so have a number of other people.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery



 

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