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  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    HC110 made simple.

    I thought I had posted this to the articles a long time ago, but I guess I didn't. So for the archives and the children, here it is.

    I like Hc110. Especially for roll film. I don't like the convoluted "working
    solution" dilutions and sub dilutions, or the short times some of the dilutions
    and sub dilutions create. It should be simple to use Hc110, like Rodinal.

    If you care to research, there was a method to Kodaks madness when they
    created the dilutions and routines for HC110, but they are of little
    convenience for the darkroom enthusiast. I get more questions about
    mixing and developing with HC110 than all other developers combined. It is
    a great developer that doesn't need to be complex in usage, so I concocted a
    metric dilution that goes by 50 (1+49) That means you use 1 ml of HC110 for
    every 49 ml of water in a direct from the concentrate dilution.

    Here is how to use it on roll film in an inversion tank, like Rodinal:

    First of all, forget about saving and replenishing it. Mix up what you need, use
    it, and dump it. It's so cheap under normal usage that saving it is fairly
    useless from a cost savings perspective, plus consistent performance is
    assured by using it one-shot.

    Next, forget about an intermediate working solution. Mix it directly from the
    concentrate. Use a small bottle and a baby syringe (available at any drug
    store) to mix directly from the concentrate. Simply mix it 1+49 . Use the times
    below as a starting guide (you may not expose the same as me, or may not
    have the same taste in negatives, so these are only suggestions that should
    get you in the ballpark to do your own tweeking)

    So without further ado,

    Hc110 direct from concentrate-1+49 , 68f 20c, agitate first 30s with 2
    inversions every 30s thereafter.

    ****Note to the civilized-Please keep in mind that this methodology is for the
    US version of the concentrate*****

    Acros100 @ 100 - 8 min
    Efke 25 @ 20 - 10.5 min
    Efke100 @ 100 - 10 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 64 - 9 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 125 - 11 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 400 - 8 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 800 - 11.5 min
    Plus X @ 125 - 8 min
    Tmax100 @ 100 - 9 min
    Tmax400 @ 400 - 9 min
    TriX320 @ 320 -8 min
    TriX400 @ 400 - 8 min

    The following was provided by photographer David William White:

    Arista EDU-Ultra 100 @ 100 - 6.5 min
    Ilford Pan F+ @ 50 - 5.5 min

  2. #41
    Doc W's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Don't forget, that 1.5 ml of concentrate per sheet means just 48 ml of dilution B per sheet.

    For this to be meaningful for developing a single sheet, you need a tank that will ensure even immersion and development flow with just 48 ml of developer - I don't think that such a beast exists.

    By necessity, with 4 x 5 film you need to either develop multiple sheets at the same time, or use more than the minimum amount of developer.
    Matt, yes, thanks for the reminder. I use dilution F so I can get development times for N minus development up to 4-5 minutes. With the other dilutions, the development time is too short for comfort. What the new numbers mean for me is that I can do more sheets at this high dilution without having to use such a large volume of developer. For single sheets, I still have to use the same amount as for multiple sheets, but this is not a big problem.

  3. #42
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Depends on whether you work in metric or english system. I use whichever is easiest for the dilution I'm using! So for 1+31 I'd use an ounce of concentrate to make a quart of solution.
    True, as an American I find the American system confusing, even as a kid I never could get my quarts and pints straight... I prefer metric for everything because its much easier for me.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #43
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    My understanding is that the only currently available packaging is in 1 liter, which is not the same concentration as the original US packaging (493 ml or something like that). I still have a full bottle of the latter, and had been using it at the "unofficial" dilution H (1:63) which is twice the dilution of B. That has worked well enough for me, and I'll probably just stick to that as it takes me a bit further especially on 120 film where one needs a larger developer volume. If you work on 550 ml at 1:49, it will require 11 ml of concentrate, twice what is technically necessary per film. The obvious solution is to load two rolls onto one Paterson reel, which is entirely possible, but that means having to hoard films that require the same developing time. At dil H 10 ml gives me 640 ml of developer, and saves me a few drops of precious developer. It is very expensive to import liquids, so every drop helps.

    For most films, HC-110 gives me a very similar result to Rodinal. However, Rollei RPX400 and Kentmere 400 fog something terrible in Rodinal, and are miles better in HC-110. I suspect that it might be true for some other emulsions also.
    Why 550 and not 500ml? Which is what most tanks take, or 1L for a bigger tank.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #44
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    True, as an American I find the American system confusing, even as a kid I never could get my quarts and pints straight... I prefer metric for everything because its much easier for me.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm familiar and comfortable with metric, but argue loudly against the US converting. For everyday use I think the American units are just more usable in scale and make a lot of sense. I work mostly in metric in the darkroom but when I see something like 1+31 or 1+15 I instantly switch to US. I don't seem to have any problems using either. But then mental arithmetic is, fortunately, pretty easy for me (annoys my wife who calls me "calculator brain" sometimes.)

  6. #45
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I'm familiar and comfortable with metric, but argue loudly against the US converting. For everyday use I think the American units are just more usable in scale and make a lot of sense. I work mostly in metric in the darkroom but when I see something like 1+31 or 1+15 I instantly switch to US. I don't seem to have any problems using either. But then mental arithmetic is, fortunately, pretty easy for me (annoys my wife who calls me "calculator brain" sometimes.)
    The funny part is that our soda is in Liters it's just our milk and gas that's gallons and orange juice that's quarts, it's all screwy lol

    Also, I'm pretty math brained except with the US measures system, I can multiply 4 numbers by 4 numbers in my head within 5 minutes while doing something that requires spacial skills (like playing billiards for example) and be correct in my answer. That's an actual genius test that most people cannot do. But I just can't do the US measures lol go figure.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #46
    Doc W's Avatar
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    It is extremely important to remember that an English pint is 20 ounces. Important for the pub, not the darkroom.

    I grew up in Canada when we learned Imperial measure and only found out that an American gallon was different when I got into photography. Then Canada switched to metric. Ask me why I am easily confused.

  8. #47
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    The funny part is that our soda is in Liters it's just our milk and gas that's gallons and orange juice that's quarts, it's all screwy lol

    Also, I'm pretty math brained except with the US measures system, I can multiply 4 numbers by 4 numbers in my head within 5 minutes while doing something that requires spacial skills (like playing billiards for example) and be correct in my answer. That's an actual genius test that most people cannot do. But I just can't do the US measures lol go figure.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    I agree it's screwy.

    Soda is in liters NOW. I'm old enough to remember when the 2 liter was brand new and explaining to my parents that it was about a half cup more than half a gallon.

    Funny (in the sense of "peculiar" not "amusing" but while I'm well enough versed in metric I still find myself converting back to approximate US measures when it comes to visualizing how much of something there is or how big something is. Just a matter of what one grows up with and uses most in formative years I think. I'm sure it could be reversed with enough effort but I haven't cared to do that.

    I certainly can't multi task like that. I MIGHT be able to do the multiplication, but only if quiet and undisturbed. My wife thinks it's amazing that I can even add, say, three digit numbers in my head, or get very very close to the final price of a basket of goods at the grocery store (if I've been paying attention as we went along) including sales tax. You're talking about a whole different level of mental math. But the US measures are more a matter of memorization than math. Once you've memorized the units, the math is pretty simple - at least, it's simple for me and should be far simpler for you. It's not AS simple as the powers of 10 in metric, but it's simple enough.

  9. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I'm familiar and comfortable with metric, but argue loudly against the US converting. For everyday use I think the American units are just more usable in scale and make a lot of sense. I work mostly in metric in the darkroom but when I see something like 1+31 or 1+15 I instantly switch to US. I don't seem to have any problems using either. But then mental arithmetic is, fortunately, pretty easy for me (annoys my wife who calls me "calculator brain" sometimes.)
    I totally agree. I often asks those who advocate adoption of the metric system to try building a house using a meter stick. For many years the CGPM refused to recognize such prefixes as deca- and deci-. So the cooks deciliter was illegal as were decimeters. Hence my comment on use of a meter stick.

    Of course in a way we do use the metric system since the US has redefined the inch to be exactly 2.54 cm.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-30-2013 at 09:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #49
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    I totally agree. I often asks those who advocate adoption of the metric system to try building a house using a meter stick. For many years the CGPM refused to recognize such prefixes as deca- and deci-. So the cooks deciliter was illegal as were decimeters. Hence my comment on use of a meter stick.

    Of course in a way we do use the metric system since the US has redefined the inch to be exactly 2.54 cm.
    Interesting so how do people build houses in other metric based countries, or have they simply stopped building houses...


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  11. #50
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I agree it's screwy.

    Soda is in liters NOW. I'm old enough to remember when the 2 liter was brand new and explaining to my parents that it was about a half cup more than half a gallon.

    Funny (in the sense of "peculiar" not "amusing" but while I'm well enough versed in metric I still find myself converting back to approximate US measures when it comes to visualizing how much of something there is or how big something is. Just a matter of what one grows up with and uses most in formative years I think. I'm sure it could be reversed with enough effort but I haven't cared to do that.

    I certainly can't multi task like that. I MIGHT be able to do the multiplication, but only if quiet and undisturbed. My wife thinks it's amazing that I can even add, say, three digit numbers in my head, or get very very close to the final price of a basket of goods at the grocery store (if I've been paying attention as we went along) including sales tax. You're talking about a whole different level of mental math. But the US measures are more a matter of memorization than math. Once you've memorized the units, the math is pretty simple - at least, it's simple for me and should be far simpler for you. It's not AS simple as the powers of 10 in metric, but it's simple enough.
    It is a different mental math, you're right, but it's one based on sets of 10 just like the metric system, so that's probably why it's easier for me.

    I wouldst be able to add up all the groceries though, or I suppose I would but I wouldn't want to haha


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller



 

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