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  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    HC110 made simple.

    I thought I had posted this to the articles a long time ago, but I guess I didn't. So for the archives and the children, here it is.

    I like Hc110. Especially for roll film. I don't like the convoluted "working
    solution" dilutions and sub dilutions, or the short times some of the dilutions
    and sub dilutions create. It should be simple to use Hc110, like Rodinal.

    If you care to research, there was a method to Kodaks madness when they
    created the dilutions and routines for HC110, but they are of little
    convenience for the darkroom enthusiast. I get more questions about
    mixing and developing with HC110 than all other developers combined. It is
    a great developer that doesn't need to be complex in usage, so I concocted a
    metric dilution that goes by 50 (1+49) That means you use 1 ml of HC110 for
    every 49 ml of water in a direct from the concentrate dilution.

    Here is how to use it on roll film in an inversion tank, like Rodinal:

    First of all, forget about saving and replenishing it. Mix up what you need, use
    it, and dump it. It's so cheap under normal usage that saving it is fairly
    useless from a cost savings perspective, plus consistent performance is
    assured by using it one-shot.

    Next, forget about an intermediate working solution. Mix it directly from the
    concentrate. Use a small bottle and a baby syringe (available at any drug
    store) to mix directly from the concentrate. Simply mix it 1+49 . Use the times
    below as a starting guide (you may not expose the same as me, or may not
    have the same taste in negatives, so these are only suggestions that should
    get you in the ballpark to do your own tweeking)

    So without further ado,

    Hc110 direct from concentrate-1+49 , 68f 20c, agitate first 30s with 2
    inversions every 30s thereafter.

    ****Note to the civilized-Please keep in mind that this methodology is for the
    US version of the concentrate*****

    Acros100 @ 100 - 8 min
    Efke 25 @ 20 - 10.5 min
    Efke100 @ 100 - 10 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 64 - 9 min
    Ilford FP4+ @ 125 - 11 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 400 - 8 min
    Ilford HP5 @ 800 - 11.5 min
    Plus X @ 125 - 8 min
    Tmax100 @ 100 - 9 min
    Tmax400 @ 400 - 9 min
    TriX320 @ 320 -8 min
    TriX400 @ 400 - 8 min

    The following was provided by photographer David William White:

    Arista EDU-Ultra 100 @ 100 - 6.5 min
    Ilford Pan F+ @ 50 - 5.5 min
    That's just, like, my opinion, man...

  2. #61
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    HC-110 is so versatile

    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    Using the 1:49 dilution I developed Tri-X @1600 for 16 minutes, agitate every couple of minutes. It turned out pretty decent although quite contrasty. If I do it again I might try agitating even less.

    Also 400 -> 1600 is only a two-stop push.

    Here are a couple of samples:


    Meat the Vegans by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    River Runner by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr
    You can do stand development 1:100 from concentrate to tame contrast.
    “We are buried beneath the weight of information, which is being confused with knowledge; quantity is being confused with abundance and wealth with happiness.
    We are monkeys with money and guns.”

    ― Tom Waits

  3. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    You can do stand development 1:100 from concentrate to tame contrast.
    I've also done 1:150 semi stand (Dilution J) or 1:250 (Dilution M) with success for some gorgeous tonality.

  4. #63
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcoldslabs View Post
    This is an old thread, I realize, but I wanted to add a correction. I develop all of my B&W 4x5 sheets in Cibachrome 4x5 drums. These only hold 40ml of solution so I have standardized my HC-110 dilution at 1:39. I get perfectly even negatives with this set-up and have yet to process one so dense that it exhausted the 1 ml of concentrate per single sheet.

    So yes, this beast exists!

    Jonathan
    What a great idea!

    I stand corrected!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #64

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    Why is it we all talk about time and dilution, but never mention temp?

  6. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    Why is it we all talk about time and dilution, but never mention temp?
    It's assumed the temp is 68/20 degrees unless otherwise specified

  7. #66
    Photo-gear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    Why is it we all talk about time and dilution, but never mention temp?
    Unless there is something unusual with the combo developer + film, the temperature chart says it all.

  8. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    It's assumed the temp is 68/20 degrees unless otherwise specified
    Pet peeve of mine too - you'll never get close to that in summer here without a water chiller. I settled on 75F because I can (almost - occasionally ambient solutions will be 76-77 in the worst of summer heat) always use my Jobo to heat UP to that temperature.

    Fortunately Ilford publishes a neat chart that makes equivalent conversion for starting points simple, then after the initial conversion I fine tune as usual except using 75F.

  9. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo-gear View Post
    Unless there is something unusual with the combo developer + film, the temperature chart says it all.


    Most of the quotes are not referencing a chart, they are proclaiming what works for them.

  10. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Pet peeve of mine too - you'll never get close to that in summer here without a water chiller. I settled on 75F because I can (almost - occasionally ambient solutions will be 76-77 in the worst of summer heat) always use my Jobo to heat UP to that temperature.

    Fortunately Ilford publishes a neat chart that makes equivalent conversion for starting points simple, then after the initial conversion I fine tune as usual except using 75F.
    Wow! Why don't you have an air conditioner?

  11. #70

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    At the risk of answering for Roger, it's probably because the cold water out of the tap is that warm. AC doesn't help much with that.
    When I lived in the desert our cold water was as warm as bath water in the summer.



 

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