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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Kodak B&W Reversal processing formulae

    Kodak D168
    B&W Reversal First Developer


    Metol 2g
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 90g
    Hydroquinone 8g
    Sodium Carbonate (anhyd) 44.5g
    Potassium Thiocyanate 2g
    Water to 1 litre

    Kodak D67
    (Kodak D19 + Thiocyanate)
    B&W Reversal First Developer
    Metol 2g
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 90g
    Hydroquinone 8g
    Sodium Carbonate (anhyd) 45g
    Potassium Thiocyanate 2g
    Potassium Bromide 5g
    Water to 1 litre


    Kodak R21a Bleach Bath

    Water 750ml
    Potassium Dichromate 50g
    Sulphuric acid (conc) 50ml
    Water to 1 litre

    Use 1:9

    ADD THE SULPHURIC ACID TO THE 750ml SLOWLY, DROP BY DROP.

    Kodak R21b Clearing Bath

    Sodium Sulphite 50g
    Sodium Hydroxide 1g
    Water to 1 litre


    2nd Developer
    Kodak D158


    Metol 3.2g
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 50g
    Hydroquinone 13.3g
    Sodium Carbonate (anhyd) 69g
    Potassium Bromide 0.9g
    Water to 1 litre

    Use 1:1

    2nd Developer
    Kodak D8

    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 90g
    Hydroquinone 45g
    Sodium Hydroxide 37.5g
    Potassium Bromide 30g
    Water to 1 litre

    Use Full Strength


    REVERSAL PROCESSING

    First Developer

    D168 - Use Undiluted or 1:1 - 5-10 minutes at 20°C
    Recommended for all Kodak continuous tone films.

    Or D67 (D19 + Thiocyanate) - Use Undiluted -6 minutes at 20°C
    Suitable for Panatomic-X

    Wash 5 mins

    Bleach R21a 3-5 mins

    Wash 2 mins

    Clear R21b 2 mins

    Wash 30 seconds

    Re-expose - 2½ mins, light source not specified, but 500w bulb at 1½ metres would be normal.

    Second Developer

    D158 1+1 2-5 mins at 20°C
    or D8 FS 4 mins at 20°C

    Wash 30 secs

    Fix in normal acid hardening fixer.

    Wash 15-30 minutes

    While no specific time is listed for D168 6 minutes, undiluted at 20°C would be a good staring point. The formulae for D168 and D67 (D19 with Thiocyanate) are very similar. D19 is available commercially and can be adapted to make D67.
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 07-29-2008 at 12:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    This formula will produce less than satisfactory positives.

    I wish I could enlighten.

    There will be published reversal tips in the upcoming new edition of the Darkroom Cookbook / Anchel

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Your logic amazes me. These are well tried and tested Kodak Formulae, the fact that you might not be able to get good results using them is another issue entirely.

    The first developer is fairly standard for use with B&W Reversal of stills and Cine film, as are the bleach and clearing bath.

    So lets look forward to any revelations or insights there may be in the new Anchell book.

    One thing you seem to forget is that B&W reversal processing has been around a long time, plenty of very good reliable information is available from a very wide variety of sources. There are still labs around capable of extremely high quality B&W reversal processing of Cine film, and in the past there were an awful lot more. Some of these labs would typically have been processing as much film per day as you probably process in a month or even possibly year. So what makes you think you or your dr5 process is any better than others.

  4. #4
    AutumnJazz's Avatar
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    Ian, I can't wait for the rest of your found formulas. (Yes, I remember your post.)

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I have to agree with Ian. This process has given results that have even been used in Hollywood production, albeit years ago.

    PE

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    More to come

    AutumnJazz, I'm slowly going through what I have with me, soon I'll post a number of alternative first developers some with and some without silver solvents (thiosulphate/thiocyanate), along with alternative bleaches (that's alternatives to permanganate/bichromate).

    For instance one first developer system is rather like using Dr Beers Variable Contrast print developer, the balance of Hydroquinone/metol is varied to increase or decrease the contrast of the final positive.

    Plus a variety of Second developers & alternatives to enable users to produce a whole range of different tones and colours in the final positives. This will enable skilled users to have far more control over their output than could ever be possible using a commercial laboratory.

    Also ways to improve or modify commercially processed positives. Before dr5 takes offence at that I'm talking about how to improve under or over exposed positives or change image tone & colour on Black & White home processed, Scala, dr5 or any other commercial B&W positives.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 07-29-2008 at 10:34 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: add a paragraph

  7. #7
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr5chrome View Post
    This formula will produce less than satisfactory positives.

    I wish I could enlighten.

    There will be published reversal tips in the upcoming new edition of the Darkroom Cookbook / Anchel

    And you can't because?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  8. #8

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    It has been a long time since the last answer to this post, so maybe it is too dated. Anyhow, some time ago I made a project, and I developed cine in my darkroom thanks to help from members of APUG. The main problem was that in my country, some chemicals (metol for example) are impossible to find. I managed to complete the process by adding 10g of hypo to 1L of Dektol stock (1st developer) for 8m at 20Cº using TRI-X (super 8) film. The bleach I used was R-9 (1 L water + Potassium dichromate 9.5g + Sulfuric acid 12ml). I remembered I had problems with a potassium permanganate bleach. As a second developer I used dektol without Hypo. Here is a link to the thread:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/8...per-8-a-3.html

    I know this may not be as technical as I would like it to be, but is one of the most fascinating discoveries I made in my darkroom thanks to APUG. I also believe that I have to give it back some how, and I think that a complete ignorant on chemestry (like me) or a student on a budget (like me) or a third worlder without access to metol (like me) may find this cheap and easy solution helpful.

    I Hope someone would read this.



 

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