Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,228   Posts: 1,532,719   Online: 820
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #1
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,215
    Images
    20

    Glycin Developers for Film

    I have not tried these, but since people are experimenting with Ansco 130 as a film developer, they seem to be of potential interest. These come from The Morgan & Morgan Darkroom Book, ed. Algis Balsys and Liliane DeCock-Morgan (Dobbs Ferry, NY: Morgan & Morgan, 1980), pp. 152-55. The book has some obvious typos, like a recipe for Agfa #12 that leaves out the developing agent, so if anyone can confirm these from other sources, that would be helpful.

    Agfa #8--Normal Contrast Glycin Developer

    Warm water 52 C--750 ml
    Sodium Sulfite, desiccated--12.5 g
    Glycin--2.0 g
    Potassium Carbonate--25.0 g
    Add cold water to make 1.0 liter

    Development time for ASA 100-125 films is 10-12 min. at 20 C

    Agfa #72--Soft working developer

    Water 52 C--1.0 liter
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)--125 g
    Glycin--50 g
    Potassium Carbonate--250 g

    For tank development, dilute 1+10 and develop at 18 C for 15-20 min.
    For tray development, dilute 1+4 and develop at 18 C for 5-7 min.

    Gevaert GD-202

    Metol--1.0 g
    Sodium Sulfite--32.0 g
    Glycin--0.5 g
    Hydroquinone--0.5 g
    Sodium Carbonate--28.0 g
    Potassium Bromide--1.5 g
    Citric acid--1.0 g
    Water to make 1.0 liter

    "If exposure has been correct, the film will be properly developed in 10-12 minutes."

    Kodak D-78

    Water--750 ml
    Sodium sulfite (anhydrous)--3.0 g
    Glycin--3.0 g
    Sodium carbonate (mono)--7.2 g
    Water to make--1.0 liter

    The average development time is 15 to 25 min. at 18 C.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    Just a note about bromide in developers.

    As the level of bromide goes up, edge effects are repressed, and so with enough bromide you can reduce sharpness substantially. Reducing alkali, as long as pH can be maintained, will increase edge effects somewhat.

    Like all "rules", these are generalizations that should be tested. People state that contrast is good, but give no proof that sharpness or grain are maintained and etc...

    You know, there is a "theory of developer design" for engineers. Maybe someday I should teach it.

    PE

  3. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Earth
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,560
    Yes.

    I am sure that would the most popular thread around,
    excluding the joke thread.

  4. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,132
    It was reported that glycin does not dissolve in propylene glycol (to make long lasting 2-part developers) but only in TEA. However I made this experiment: 2g glycin, 6ml TEA, 1tsp water,on heating gently and stirring this formed a clear solution which dissolved in 14 ml propylene glycol.The solution is only a few days old so it is not known if it is stable.
    Heating these organic solutions cannot be made completely risk free IMO.

  5. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,215
    Images
    20
    I've merged two threads on Ansco 130 for film into this thread--

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...eveloping.html

    There is another thread on Ansco 130 as a split developer, and the search engine will also turn up threads on Agfa 8 and Kodak D-78.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    FWIW, that Morgan and Morgan darkroom book, I have also found, has a considerable number of typos and other errors in its formulary. I packed it away years ago rather than rely on it.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    Tom: any photos you can post so we can see how this is working out for you? Sounds interesting.
    Yes, I'll dig out some photos developed semi-stand in diluted Ansco 130 and post them. I'll post some Agfa-8 examples as well.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  8. #17
    Trask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,063
    Images
    6
    Thanks -- I'm particularly interested in these two developers.

  9. #18
    CBG
    CBG is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    894
    Hi Trask. Can you give names for those formulae, and can you pass on title and publisher etc for the books you found them in?


    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    Thanks for the formulas, David. I have a few more culled from some photo lab books in French I picked up in Brussels, but they call for exotic components like Diethylparaphenylenediamine sulfite (or sulphate, it’s not clear) and hydroxyethyl-o-aminophenol.

    Here’s one that’s stated to be a compensating developer:

    Sodium Sulphite 40 grams
    Potassium Carbonate 40 grams
    Glycin 8 grams
    Phenidone 0.5 gram
    Potassium Bromide 2 grams
    Water 1000 ml

    Dilute 1:1, average time of development at 20 degrees Centigrade: 8-12 minutes.

    Another, somewhat similar, formula is said to be fine grain and come from Ilford:

    Sodium Sulphite 90 grams
    Sodium Carbonate 2 grams
    Borax 2 grams
    Glycin 5 grams
    Phenidone 0.2 gram
    Water 1000 ml

    Used straight, average time of development 8 minutes.

    An alternate formulation also said to be from Ilford, in a different book, as follows:

    Hot water 700 ml
    Borax 2 grams

    Then, with water at 50 degrees Centigrade, add in order:

    Sodium sulphite 70 grams
    Sodium carbonate 2 grams
    Glycin 5 grams
    Phenidone 0.2 gram
    Water to bring level to 1000 ml

    For a gamma of 0.65, develop 11 minutes at 17-18 deg Cent, or 9 minutes at 18-19 degrees. (NB: no explanation as to why they’re staying below 20 deg Cent) Further, can be diluted 1:1 and used at 20 deg Cent for 8-9 minutes for slow-speed films.

  10. #19
    Trask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,063
    Images
    6
    They come from two books:

    La Pratique du Developpement by A.H. Cuisinier, Publications Photo-Cinema Paul Montel, Paris, 1966 (thirteenth edition)

    Developpement Negatifs - Noir et Blanc by Jacques Prioleaud, Publications Photo-Cinema Paul Montel, Paris, 1980 (sixth edition)

    Until writing this response forced me to look, I hadn't realized these were published by the same publisher. I bought both, I think, at a quasi-used book store in Brussels a few years ago.

    Developer #1 has no name, is just said to be "an excellent compensating developer"

    Developer #2 and #3 have no names in particular, are just sourced to Ilford. FYI, it's stated the the pH of #3 is 9.3.

    I like these older books, especially the one from 1966. It's got a formula in it that includes potassium metabisulphite, hydroquinone, phenidone, sodium sulphite, ammonium chloride, boric acid, potassium bromide, acetone and benzotriazole. I think I'd have to by stock in Photographer's Formulary before I bought all that stuff!

  11. #20
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,218
    Images
    296
    I once studied chemistry - in high school... I have no clue what these different formulas do. I just use the chemicals.

    Ansco 130 (from Photographer's Formulary) really is a good developer for film. I've done nearly twenty 5x7 sheets in it, and it gives me great negatives to print. I've used 1+4 and 1+8 so far. I like 1+8 best as highlights seem to print easier.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin