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  1. #1
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Glycin Developers for Film

    I have not tried these, but since people are experimenting with Ansco 130 as a film developer, they seem to be of potential interest. These come from The Morgan & Morgan Darkroom Book, ed. Algis Balsys and Liliane DeCock-Morgan (Dobbs Ferry, NY: Morgan & Morgan, 1980), pp. 152-55. The book has some obvious typos, like a recipe for Agfa #12 that leaves out the developing agent, so if anyone can confirm these from other sources, that would be helpful.

    Agfa #8--Normal Contrast Glycin Developer

    Warm water 52 C--750 ml
    Sodium Sulfite, desiccated--12.5 g
    Glycin--2.0 g
    Potassium Carbonate--25.0 g
    Add cold water to make 1.0 liter

    Development time for ASA 100-125 films is 10-12 min. at 20 C

    Agfa #72--Soft working developer

    Water 52 C--1.0 liter
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)--125 g
    Glycin--50 g
    Potassium Carbonate--250 g

    For tank development, dilute 1+10 and develop at 18 C for 15-20 min.
    For tray development, dilute 1+4 and develop at 18 C for 5-7 min.

    Gevaert GD-202

    Metol--1.0 g
    Sodium Sulfite--32.0 g
    Glycin--0.5 g
    Hydroquinone--0.5 g
    Sodium Carbonate--28.0 g
    Potassium Bromide--1.5 g
    Citric acid--1.0 g
    Water to make 1.0 liter

    "If exposure has been correct, the film will be properly developed in 10-12 minutes."

    Kodak D-78

    Water--750 ml
    Sodium sulfite (anhydrous)--3.0 g
    Glycin--3.0 g
    Sodium carbonate (mono)--7.2 g
    Water to make--1.0 liter

    The average development time is 15 to 25 min. at 18 C.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #31
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    Germain Finegrain


    ....

    I use this full strength. My normal time in a Jobo for TMY is 6"30" @68 deg. F, water stop, fixed in Hypam 1+4, washed. This pulls highlights down quite nicely with minus development and is responsible for about 70% of all my film development...Evan Clarke
    Evan,

    Do you replenish Germain? If you do, how do you?

    I recently mixed some and was quite happy with it using eastman XX cine film. However, because there are specific replenishment schedules worked out by Ed Lowe, I converted to Edwal 12, which differs from Germain very little -- only in the proportions of the three reducing agents, which are the same ones. Lowe suggests 3 ounces per 60 square inches; seems to work well. I suspect a similar schedule might work with Germain's version. I'm interested in your use with contractions; Lowe developed E12 for flat light, and it has a reputation of not working well for contractions.

  3. #32
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    FX-2 Data Sheet, from Photographer's Formulary:

    http://www.photoformulary.com/uploads/01-0085.pdf

    Should have mixing instructions... Sorry, that's all I can find time for right now.

    - Thomas

    Quote Originally Posted by Igor Savchenko View Post
    Hi Thomas,
    could you tell me please what is a ratio of mixing A+B+water to make the working solution in the instruction you have?
    Thanks.
    ---------
    igor
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #33

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    Thanks, Thomas!
    I've got it.

  5. #34
    Saganich's Avatar
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    When I mixed up some FX-2 I put the Glycin in before the Sodium Sulfite. Of course it didn't dissolve. When I realized my mistake I added the Sodium Sulfite and the Glycin instantly dissolved.
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

  6. #35
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    Just to give this a kick along (it's a very interesting thread) - has anyone seen or tried Voightlander 222? It looks similar but even more dilute than Dan's offering.
    I have been tempted to try it with microfilm, as at pictorial exposure these films are really 'under-exposed'! Also, as a 'frugal' photographer, anything that is 99.1% water, HAS to be good! (if it works, of course!).
    VOIGHTLANDER 222 (From Phot-O-Vergne Wiki)
    Na SO3 (sec) 1 gm
    Na CO3 (sec) 6 gm
    Glycin 2 gm
    Water to 1 litre
    Times vary from 12-15 mins for over-exposed negative to 60-120 mins for under-exposed negatives. http://www.photocrack.com/photovergn...IGHTLANDER_222

    From danqu TP-78, a film developer formulated for Tech Pan and similar high contrast slow speed films.
    In this order;
    NaSO3 1.5 grams,
    glycin 3 grams
    NaCO3 3 grams
    A less sulfited, less carbonated version of D-78.

  7. #36
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    It is interesting to note that the 1929 BJP speaks of Glycin only as a film developer.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  8. #37
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    Evan,

    Do you replenish Germain? If you do, how do you?

    I recently mixed some and was quite happy with it using eastman XX cine film. However, because there are specific replenishment schedules worked out by Ed Lowe, I converted to Edwal 12, which differs from Germain very little -- only in the proportions of the three reducing agents, which are the same ones. Lowe suggests 3 ounces per 60 square inches; seems to work well. I suspect a similar schedule might work with Germain's version. I'm interested in your use with contractions; Lowe developed E12 for flat light, and it has a reputation of not working well for contractions.

    Sorry I missed this post/ didn't reply. I don't replenish and find that the shadows come up pretty quick allowing for ease in pulling the highlights. It's easy to knock a stop off the highlights with no adverse effects and rotary development...EC

  9. #38

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    i've been using ansco 130 for film off and on for 10+ years.
    sometimes i stand develop in it, sometimes i tray process sheets in it ...
    i have never had trouble and always gotten great negatives when using it
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

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