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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    D76 variant (un-named

    Buffered Borax Developer

    This is a variant of D76 I'd not seen before, it came from the Kodak Research Laboratories and was published in 1934 in Camera, Philadelphia and the BJP 26th Oct 1934 page 638-9 (and the BJP Almanac 1935).

    Metol 2 gm
    Hydroquinone 5 gm
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 100 gm
    Borax 2 gm
    Boric Acid 14 gm
    Water to 1 litre

    (The formula was published to make 500ml, figures doubled to make 1 litre for comparative purposes)

    Ruyuki Suzuki, Sliver Garin.orb lists a D76x variant which is quite similar, but contains 0.125 gm Potassium Bromide & 15 gm Boric Acid.

    Ian

  2. #11
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    'I haven`t tried it yet with any films faster than ISO 400. '

    I'm part-way through a roll of 35mm Delta 3200 (rated 1600), I'll develop it in this and report back!

    Rob

  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Archer View Post

    I'm part-way through a roll of 35mm Delta 3200 (rated 1600), I'll develop it in this and report back!

    Rob
    I look forward to seeing the results Rob.
    If there is enough interest, I will post the formula on apug.

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Buffered Borax Developer

    This is a variant of D76 I'd not seen before, it came from the Kodak Research Laboratories and was published in 1934 in Camera, Philadelphia and the BJP 26th Oct 1934 page 638-9 (and the BJP Almanac 1935).

    Metol 2 gm
    Hydroquinone 5 gm
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 100 gm
    Borax 2 gm
    Boric Acid 14 gm
    Water to 1 litre


    (The formula was published to make 500ml, figures doubled to make 1 litre for comparative purposes)

    Ruyuki Suzuki, Sliver Garin.orb lists a D76x variant which is quite similar, but contains 0.125 gm Potassium Bromide & 15 gm Boric Acid.

    Ian
    I have found this formula in "THE FOCAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PHOTOGRAPHY" on page 414 under the name of D-76a.

  5. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Aah Kieth I knew I had D76a somewhere, thanks

    My copy's rather airline baggage unfriendly, so I gave my spare cpoy away on APUG, and the others in storage in the UK.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 08-15-2009 at 02:37 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Aah Keith I knew I had D76a somewhere, thanks

    My copy's rather airline baggage unfriendly, so I gave my spare copy away on APUG, and the others in storage in the UK.

    Ian
    Perhaps you could compile a list of the many D-76 derivatives one day Ian, along with their history and applications, perhaps a bit more in depth the Ryuji`s research on the Silver-grain site.
    That should keep you busy in between the Windisch and Rodinal researches.
    Interesting research you did on those developers by the way.

  7. #16
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Perhaps you could compile a list of the many D-76 derivatives one day Ian,

  8. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    You have a fine collection of formulae Sir.
    I have something to say about the replenisher for D-76d, but I will do a bit of research myself first, just to confirm my suspicions.

  9. #18
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I still owe you the 1947 & 35 BJP Vintage as promised

    But I've been sampling the 1910 and it's intoxicating

    Ian

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I still owe you the 1947 & 35 BJP Vintage as promised

    But I've been sampling the 1910 and it's intoxicating

    Ian
    I`m glad you`re enjoying YE OLDE BJP`s, they are well worth having in your photographic library.

    AFAIK, there is no official replenisher for D-76d, only the standard D-76R replenisher. There is also a modified replenishing method recommended by Kodak for use only with T-Max films which is made by taking 5 part of D-76 developer to 1 part of D-76R replenisher. A higher volume of this modified replenisher is used, compared with the standard replenisher. (Kodak Publication J-78).

    Using a Modified Replenisher.
    Prepare the modified replenisher by mixing D-76
    Developer and D-76R Replenisher according to the
    instructions on the packages. Then combine 5 parts of D-76
    Developer with 1 part of D-76R Replenisher, and stir until
    the solution is completely mixed. To determine the amount of
    modified replenisher solution to mix, estimate the amount
    you will need for 3 to 4 weeks. Then select packaged
    developer and replenisher to mix this amount of replenisher
    solution. For example, if you determine that you need 45.4 litres
    (12 gallons) of modified replenisher solution, prepare a 38-litre
    (10-gallon) package of D-76 Developer and two 3.8-litre
    (1-gallon) packages of D-76R Replenisher, and then combine
    these solutions. For consistent results, don’t store the mixed
    modified replenisher solution for longer than 4 weeks. With low
    utilization (when it takes longer than 1 month to turn over the
    tank solution), discard the developer after 1 month.
    The starting-point modified replenishment rate is 70 mL (2 1⁄2
    fluidounces) for each 135-36 or 120 roll or 8 x 10-inch sheet (or
    equivalent) processed. Monitor the developer activity with
    KODAK Black-and-White Film Process Control Strips and
    adjust the starting-point rate, if necessary, to keep the contrast of
    the film within the required range.
    Discard the developer after processing 9600 square inches of
    film 3.8 litres (per gallon). Capacities in numbers of rolls or
    sheets for various film sizes follow.

    Using the Original Replenisher.
    Add 22.2 to 29.6 mL (3⁄4 to 1 fluidounce) of replenisher (mixed
    according to the instructions on the package) for each 135-36 or
    120 roll or 8 x 10-inch sheet (or equivalent) processed. (This
    rate is usually sufficient to compensate for normal carry-out of
    developer from the tank, as well as chemical depletion.
    However, if much more of the solution is lost in processing than
    is replaced by replenishment, make up the loss by adding fresh
    working-strength developer.) Stir or recirculate the solution
    thoroughly after each addition of replenisher. Monitor the
    developer activity with KODAK Black-and-White Film Process
    Control Strips and adjust the starting-point rate, if necessary, to
    keep the contrast of the film within the required range.

    I think that so called D-76d replenisher might have came from Ryuji Suzuki who believed at the time as others did back then (including myself), that the commercially sold Kodak product was in fact the same formula as D-76d, which I now totally disagree with.

    It appears to me, that Ryuji came up with that replenisher formula by calculating the weight of constituents required for 5 parts of D-76d developer to 1 part of standard D-76R replenisher to make 1 litre of stock modified replenisher according to Kodak`s suggestion for replenishing T-Max films.

    Ilford also had a fact-sheet specifically for ID-11 where I find the replenishment volumes required confusing.

    ID-11 Replenishment.

    I`m not sure what to make of Ilford`s recommendations for replenishing ID-11 developer, as they give a table for so many millilitres of ID-11 replenisher for (Film-Formats X10). Does that mean a specific volume of replenisher for every 10 rolls or sheet sizes of a specific film format? As an example, they say 90ml of replenisher for 135-36 and 120 film rolls.

  11. #20
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Speaking from experience we never replenished D76/ID-11 with anything close to the Kodak/Ilford recommendations.

    The developer once seasoned has it's own dynamics, we replenished after roughly every 100 rolls of film, we never kept a roll count, it was all by instinct but it worked.

    Until recently with my 2.5 litre stock I'd only replenish after every 10-15 films and my negatives were always very consistent.

    I can't comment on Ryuji's recommendations, his website is one of the worst on the internet for listing incorrect formulae. He quotes from L.F.A. Mason yet still lists Ilford formulae with incorrect weights, wrong levels of Bromide in a warm tone developer etc, & then says it must be the paper

    Ian

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