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Article: Kodak D-25.

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    Kodak D-25.

    This formula is recommended by Kodak to produce extra fine-grain negatives than those processed with standard developers, albeit at some loss of film speed.
    Has anyone ever tried this formula?

    KODAK D-25

    Low to medium contrast fine grain film developer.

    Water, 125*F/52*C 750 ml
    Metol 7.5 grams
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous) 100 grams
    Sodium Bisulfite 15 grams
    Water to make 1 Litre.

    Mixing instructions: Add chemicals in specified sequence.

    Dilution: Use undiluted

    Starting point development time: 20 mins.

    Replenish with Kodak DK-25R.

  2. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Buckaroo Banzai forever!
    PE
    I hear they have a 2 for 1 sale on that book at K-mart.
    If you act quickly, you might still be able to pick up a couple.

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    My tongue is now plugged in!

    PE

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Actually Ron, it's a lessson on the extremes of a simple developer, one end is higher pH and acutance, the other with a low pH is very fine grain.

    In the case of Metol the middle ground, as in most practical is D23. But the there are good reasons it's not used by many.

    Ian
    *******
    Having long been addicted to replenished D23, I tried D25 several times but it was just too soft, and mushy for my taste. Kodak does suggest using half the bisulphite; but I never tried it. D25's replenisher, DK-25R, however, is what I use to replenish my D23.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    *******
    Having long been addicted to replenished D23, I tried D25 several times but it was just too soft, and mushy for my taste. Kodak does suggest using half the bisulphite; but I never tried it. D25's replenisher, DK-25R, however, is what I use to replenish my D23.
    John,

    I'm interested in replenished developers, D23 being one of them. How do you ripen a new batch of D23? and how much replenisher do you use for each 80 square inches of film developed in D23?

    Thank you,

    Mike Sullivan
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



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    The formula I posted shows bisulphite, while a Kodak formulary that I have shows metabisulphite. Kodak also suggest that D-25 is used at 25*C (77*F) and to use the development times for undiluted Microdol-X for 20*C (68*F).

    I don`t want to make it, I was simply curious how it performs with modern B&W films, hence my question if anyone has used it.

    Sorry Ron, but I don`t see the connection between D-23, D-25 and Rodinal.

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Bisulphite is mainly Metabisulphite, US ambiguity.

    Kodak in Europe seem to have had to adjust between the mixed Bisulphite/Metabisuphite sold as Bisulphite in the US and the pure Metabisulphite sold in Europe, it may really be differences in manufacture.

    Ian

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zathras View Post
    John,

    I'm interested in replenished developers, D23 being one of them. How do you ripen a new batch of D23? and how much replenisher do you use for each 80 square inches of film developed in D23?

    Thank you,

    Mike Sullivan
    ******
    I let the ripening take care of itself. I replenish with 24 ml DK-25R per 80 square inches.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post

    Sorry Ron, but I don`t see the connection between D-23, D-25 and Rodinal.
    I should have added D-76 with only Metol.

    I only mentioned from your OP, Rodinal and Patrick Gainers attempts at a Metol equivalent.

    These are sulfite developers with alkali and Metol. They represent the gamut of what can be achieved by this combination by varying basically 3 ingredients to optimize for either 2 of the 3 properties we want from a film. Vary the pH to a higher value and you approach Rodinal or Patricks formula and etc, especially if you use it very dilute as Rodinal is. Ian caught my analogy right off in another post. No need to repeat it here.

    My bottom line is that with a few basic ingredients and a small set of experiments you can play with the developer and get it to do most anything you want. When you add other, more exotic ingredients, a point I have made elsewhere, you push outside this "triangle" and can get some vastly improved properties.

    PE

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    When you add other, more exotic ingredients, a point I have made elsewhere, you push outside this "triangle" and can get some vastly improved properties.
    But you can also increase the complexity of finding a combination that works well or better.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    But you can also increase the complexity of finding a combination that works well or better.
    The answer to that is yes and no, depending on what you have done in the past with these new compounds. In fact, some of them would be new to you but not to me.

    PE

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