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  1. #1
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Optical Computing 3D Painting Art with Nonlinear Hologram in to Photopolymer

    I thought , We make a carbon print for tiny amount of 3D relief and it is linear. We cant do at photography or computer simulate the real paint relief , it is 3D and highly nonlinear. Computers are slow and it is not possible to simulate the real thing going in 1 cubic centimeters of liquid with 2000 computers in 3 months. Thats why , highest important military projects are hopeful for 30 years later technology. Thats why one aircraft project to other takes 30 years without too much difference from 1950s technology.

    I thought if the paint relief depends on navier stokes equations and if the equations are nonlinear and if it is basic to generate a transmission hologram with nonlinear functions , we can code several rules and physical equations in to several different transmission holograms and

    - first hologram calculates with light , the deviation of one point at photograph to the other point at the painting
    - second hologram calculates optically , the 3d navier stokes equations and cast the light three dimensionally in to photopolymer or gelatin.

    We got a 3d painting relief or artist medium interaction result by optical computing.

    I am waiting your opinion,

    Thank you for reading,

    Mustafa Umut Sarac
    Istanbul
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  2. #2
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    I found below now,

    Science 10 January 2014:
    Vol. 343 no. 6167 pp. 160-163
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1242818
    REPORT
    Performing Mathematical Operations with Metamaterials
    Alexandre Silva1,*, Francesco Monticone2,*, Giuseppe Castaldi3, Vincenzo Galdi3, Andrea Alù2, Nader Engheta1,†
    + Author Affiliations

    1Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
    3Waves Group, Department of Engineering, University of Sannio, Benevento I-82100, Italy.
    ↵†Corresponding author. E-mail: engheta@ee.upenn.edu
    ↵* These authors contributed equally to this work.

    ABSTRACTEDITOR'S SUMMARY
    We introduce the concept of metamaterial analog computing, based on suitably designed metamaterial blocks that can perform mathematical operations (such as spatial differentiation, integration, or convolution) on the profile of an impinging wave as it propagates through these blocks. Two approaches are presented to achieve such functionality: (i) subwavelength structured metascreens combined with graded-index waveguides and (ii) multilayered slabs designed to achieve a desired spatial Green’s function. Both techniques offer the possibility of miniaturized, potentially integrable, wave-based computing systems that are thinner than conventional lens-based optical signal and data processors by several orders of magnitude.

    Received for publication 5 July 2013.
    Accepted for publication 12 November 2013.
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  3. #3
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    that is interesting also

    Nature Photonics 3, 211 - 215 (2009)
    Published online: 22 March 2009 | doi:10.1038/nphoton.2009.29

    Subject Categories: Imaging and sensing | Fundamental optical physics

    Imaging through nonlinear media using digital holography
    Christopher Barsi1, Wenjie Wan1 & Jason W. Fleischer1,2

    Abstract
    It is well known that one cannot image directly through a nonlinear medium, as intensity-dependent phase changes distort signals as they propagate. Indirect methods can be used1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, but none has allowed for the measurement of internal wave mixing and dynamics. Recently, the reconstruction of nonlinear pulse propagation in fibres was demonstrated by generalizing the techniques of digital holography7, 8 to the nonlinear domain9. The method involves two steps: (1) recording the total field (both amplitude and phase) exiting a nonlinear medium and (2) numerically back-propagating the wavefunction. Here, we extend this process to two-dimensional spatial beams and experimentally demonstrate it in a self-defocusing photorefractive crystal, giving examples in soliton formation, dispersive radiation and imaging. For known nonlinearity, the technique enables reconstruction of wave dynamics within the medium and suggests new methods of super-resolved imaging, including subwavelength microscopy and lithography. For unknown nonlinearity, the method facilitates modelling and characterization of the optical response.

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    Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
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  4. #4

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    Holograms arem on my list of things to do, got to make a simple optical bench later this summer.

  5. #5
    marfa.tx
    Quote Originally Posted by infundibulum View Post
    Holograms arem on my list of things to do, got to make a simple optical bench later this summer.

    Seek Synthetic holography... No bench necessary



 

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