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  1. #1
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    A Basic Overview of Minolta pre-AF 35mm SLR's

    Well, we've all heard of the Rokkor Files. I thought that APUG should have its own abbreviated version. And as I have suffered through innumerable GAS attacks in the past by taking Minolta for relief I thought I would take the initiative.

    This article is an outline of the Minolta pre-AF 35mm SLR cameras, from the sr-2 through the X-570. This will not be nearly as in-depth as Miniman's offering but this should whet the appetite. So, without any further ado . . .

    The Roster/ Cameras and Production

    sr-2 – in production 1958-1960

    sr-1 – in production 1959-1971

    sr-3 – in production 1960-1962

    sr-7 – in production 1962-1966

    sr-T101 – in production 1966-1981

    sr-M – in production 1970-1975

    sr-T100 – in production 1971-1975

    x-1/ xm/ xk – in production 1973-1981
    sr-T102 / Super 303 – in production 1973-1975
    SC/ MC – in production 1973-1975

    sr-T200 – in production 1976-1981
    sr-T201/101b – in production 1976-1981
    sr-T202/303b – in production 1976-1980
    sr-T100b – in production 1976-1977
    SR101 – in production 1976-1977
    SR505 – in production 1976-1977
    xk motor – in production 1976-1985

    XD-11/ XD-7/ XD – in production 1977-1984
    XG-7/ XG-E/ XG2 – in production 1977-???
    SC II/MC II – in production 1977-1980

    sr-T100x – in production 1978-1981
    SR101s – in production 1978-1981
    SR505s – in production 1978-1980
    XG-1 – in production 1978-1981
    XG-SE – in production 1978-???

    XG-9/ XG-S – in production 1979-???

    X-7 – in production 1980-1982

    XG-A – in production 1981-???
    X700 – in production 1981-1999

    XG-M/ X-70 – in production 1982-???
    XG-1(n) – in production 1982-1984

    X-570/ X-500 – in production 1983-???



    OK. Everybody is at least familiar with the classics manual focus SLR setup. Or should be. Most have owned a couple over the years. So we won't delve too deeply into each and every model as the Rokkor Files (http://www.rokkorfiles.com)has done this extensively and is a highly recommended alternate (or primary if you're not the one writing this article) resource for info on the Minolta/Rokkor gear. But we will go over the basics and a bit more for certain models.

    Minolta crashed onto the SLR (single lens reflex) scene with their 'sr' series cameras in 1958. One thing about post-war Japan and Germany. Once they stopped making tanks they focused (no pun intended) their energies into providing the world with quality photographic equipment through the following decades. And the Minolta line from Japan is certainly no exception. The 'sr' series came about in 1958 as the sr-2 was born. As in the instance of the Model T predating the Model A, the sr-2 led the sr-1 into the world by a year.

    This early SLR featured such innovations as an instant diaphragm for viewing the subject in the fullest light available, the instant return mirror for near constant viewing of the subject, Minolta's own glass under the designation “Rokkor” that featured a line of lenses including a 55mm f/1.8, a 35mm f/2.8, a 100mm f/3.5, a 135mm f/2.8, a 250mm f/4 and a 600mm f/5.6.

    Then, in 1966, Minolta released the first in a long series of cameras that featured TTL or through-the-lens metering of the subject thus negating the need to lug around a handheld light meter if that was the wish of the photographer. Thus, the sr-T series of 35mm SLR's was born. This series of cameras employed a needle light meter that received its information from a photocell located in the pentaprism foreword of the viewfinder opening. The new Rokkor lenses made for this purpose were coined MC or meter coupled lenses to facilitate this feature. They were three lug bayonet mount lenses (three lug for the three protrusions around the base of the lens that retained the lens to the camera body when twisted and locked and bayonet for the need to insert the lens into the camera body rather than to thread it into the camera body). Along with this ship of the line an entire fleet of smaller craft in the form of dedicated accessories was introduced as well. From teleconverters to winders to flashes to hip lookin' straps, The Minolta was an affordable and (in this author's humble opinion) an equally functional option to the flagship Nikon's and Canon's of the age.

    Then, in 1977, the year of Grease and Star Wars, Minolta revolutionized the photography world on a grand scale. They introduced the XD-11. This camera was the first to feature an aperture priority function and a shutter priority function on the same body. And I do not mean the first Minolta to do so. I mean the first camera ever. Period. Coupled with exquisite Rokkor glass and an array of accessories such as the D winder, this new XD-11 (or XD-7 in Europe and XD in Japan) turned the 35mm SLR film world on its proverbial ear. Never before had so much versatility been placed into the hands of a photographer. And no greater leap would be made until the advent of automatic focusing, which comes after this article's subject matter.

    The final stop on this short trip leads us to the year 1981. The last high-end MF SLR offering by Minolta was the X-700. This camera still had manual metering mode and aperture priority. But it came with an automatic exposure mode. Finally, we come full circle back to the bells and whistles version of the point and shoot. This was a major draw for snapshootists who wanted an expensive camera but lacked even the basic knowledge required to operate some of its progenitors or the professional for whom speed was of the essence. It also had a direct auto flash metering system so that guide numbers and calculations need not be employed in order to arrive with adequate results from the use of flash lighting. It would even beep at you in the Program mode when the shutter speed would drop below 1/30 of a second.

    Personally, I have shot with Minolta SLR's since my photographic beginning (not including the disk camera I got when I was 15 and din't care what a candle was, let alone one per square foot). Twenty three years ago I was handed my mother's X-370 and was told the basics in exposure settings. She did not know that it was the Law of Reciprocity that enabled those settings to exist but she more than got me started down the right path. In 1996, I was given a Minolta XG-M, a camera bag, a Vivitar 2800 Auto Thyristor flash, a Vivitar 50mm f/2 MD mount and a Quantaray 70-210 MD mount lens and a spongy green strap. And that is how my love affair with Minolta came to be. Only for a short time during 2008 was I ever out of possession of a Minolta SLR. And it felt so wrong that I went right out and had to rectify the situation. In the past two decades plus, I have owned or shot the following:

    XG-M (owned 3/own 1)
    XG-E (owned 1/own 0)
    XD-7 (owned 1/own 0/know where it is/didn't know what it was at the time/dummy me/ I digress)
    XG-A (owned 1/own 0)
    XG-1 (owned 4/ own 2)
    sr-T101 (owned 3/own 2)
    X-370 (never owned/ used often)

    God knows how many lenses and such have come in and out of my possession over the years. If I had kept it all I would have upwards of 15 camera bodies and about 40 lenses. Even so, I have six friends whom, over the last ten years or so, are now film photographers and own and use Minolta systems, compliments of yours truly. I now currently have two XG-1's (one in perfect working order, one missing the rewind lever but works fine) a Rokkor 45mm pancake lens, a Vivitar 28mm, a Makinon 135mm and a Quantaray 70-210 zoom: all MD mount. And I have two sr-T101's and an XG-M on the way to see if I can't resurrect them from the dead. I haven't even picked up my Minoltas since November as I had acquired a 4x5 press camera in exchange for an RB67 and have been shooting LF ever since. But I know that my Minoltas will always be there for me. They're just like Linus' security blanket. As long as they are in my closet, all will be right with the world.



    From Milton, Delaware. Where the introverts stare through their own viewfinders and the extroverts stare through yours. I'm Christopher Walrath.


    (.pdf manuals available for most. PM author for details)



    Some Sources used here:
    Extensive personal experience and accumulated files
    THE ROKKOR FILES
    PHOTOETHNOGRAPHY.COM
    MINOLTA PAGE ON PBASE.COM
    Last edited by Christopher Walrath; 02-11-2010 at 11:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  2. #2
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    We should have others write about the comparable Nikons, Canons, Pentaxes and others. Hope you all enjoy it.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I became a fan of Minolta about a year ago when I bought an XE-1 (XE-7 in the US). I liked the fact that the prime lenses cost a lot less than comparable Nikkors.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #4
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Even straight Rokkor glass won't set you back too awful much. Secondary manufacturer's glass is half that. Thanks for the reads, all.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #5
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Imagine a digital SLR being produced for twelve years (like the SR-1) in the same configuration... Good read, although I never really fancied Minoltas.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #6
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Well, we can't all be perfect. ;p Thanks for the read.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #7

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    The only 35mm I have know is a XG 9,fine camera but you have to make sure to turn it off when not using it ,the bat. will drain and camera will not function.

  8. #8
    rhmimac's Avatar
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    I just bought a perfect sr-T303b and 3 MF lenses ( Minolta50f1.7, Vivitar 28f2.8 and 135f2.8) or my 17yr old daughter who insisted on also becoming an analog photog after 2yrs of taking pictures with a 2nd hand Nikon D.. I got her to learn some basics.
    Though the machine could do everyting manualy, she could not get herself further than the green button and shot as a soldier hoping for a couple keepers after that.
    But surprise,surprise the girl was getting bored taking the d.g.t.l frames and she loved the look of my neutral color gold200 4"x6" prints I still kept shooting.
    What I told her after she got the Minolta is simple: measure the scene take care of positioning the meter with the O on the right in line with the needle, focus the lens precisely and of you go.
    Five minutes, no manual to read, no tutorial to search on the net, nadda. Just 5 minutes of explaining the basic meter and focus the ring.
    Oh man I fell in love with this sr-T303b for sure. But it's hers. She takes it everywhere and shoots 2 yr expired Gold200 with a lot more keepers!
    Then she came to me in a state and reported almost crying: dad I saw the camera back was open in my camerabag! All my pics ruined!
    Close it and shoot it till the end I advised. Maybe the lomo effects will make it worth keeping... And it did. Nice foging from the sides and the top. She loved it and I enjoyed her joy.

    rhmimac

    PS. all her 17 and 18yr old friends are on MF 135 camera's now shooting wild negs and 4 by 6 prints; they dropped the d.g.t.l sh.t. for a moment, I sincerely hope they stay. I'm a proud father.
    And I love her even more now.

    rhmimac

  9. #9

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    Must say that although I sold off my Minolta equipment a few years back in trade for Nikon gear, I do truly miss my Minolta. It (a SRT-100) was my first real camera, which I bought myself when I was 14 back in 1997. That thing went with me EVERYWHERE. Eventually I amassed a decent collection of Rokkor and Celtic (Minolta's answer to the Series-E) lenses, and eventually traded the 100 for a 101. Lugged it, as it's predicessor with me for several years, including my trip to Germany in 2002. But, sadly a few years later I began to step slightly into digital, and decided Nikon a better investment and thus traded all my Minolta in for a really nice FE.

    Honestly, I want another one and I'm seriously thinking about checking out KEH to see what's up.

  10. #10
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Oughtta be easy enough to find. I will mention that I had three different Celtic 135's MD mount. And I must have been a junk Celtic magnet. But all three of them were crap. ebay buys so maybe I got stuck. But three in a row. Even my luck isn't that bad. I ended getting a Makinon 135 MD and that was one of the best lenses I ever had for the Minny's.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

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