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  1. #31

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    probably won't happen. As far as I know, the 4x5 machines were destroyed. But they own 8x10 machines and are working on 8x10 film. This won't be peel apart film, but integral film like the current small films. Check out these transfers by wonderful polaroid artist Galimberti: http://www.mauriziogalimberti.it/?p=576&lang=it samples:
    and there is the new55 project, but there is a long way to go... http://new55project.blogspot.de/
    cheers!

  2. #32
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    I count 15 out of 35 with bad ooo spread at the first reference above.

    PE

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter de Groot View Post
    TI do question though why Fuji can do the same trick as Polaroid and TIP cannot shield the forming image against light
    In Fuji instax light hits image from behind and then it travels in front, and when paper is going out of the camera - back of the paper is filled with black ink that stays there. So there is no need for layer that is shielding picture and becoming transparent later in couple of minutes.

  4. #34

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    If anyone has had issue with the film that is not user error, you can of course contact us directly and we can troubleshoot and offer replacement film as necessary. Regardless of knowing what the formula is for Polaroid film, most of the chemical components Polaroid used are either no longer available or are banned by current environmental laws. Impossible film is comprised of entirely new chemistry and, outward appearances aside, is made from about 90% new materials in general. It took Polaroid 17 years to refine their integral film. Impossible has made huge strides in 2 years, considering it is from a whole new chemistry. Consider it like someone saying, "Make a cake that looks like a cake and tastes like a cake and feels like a cake, but you can't use any of the ingredients that are in cake."

    You cannot think of Impossible film as Polaroid film. As a result of Polaroid's decision to pull the plug, Polaroid film is long gone. Impossible is the ONLY company making film for Polaroid cameras now. You have to unlearn everything you know about Polaroid film. This is not Polaroid film. So Photo Engineer's statement, "You should not have to be "taught" how to use a commercial product that has antecedents" just doesn't apply at all. Impossible film doesn't have antecedents.

    All of us at Impossible have a passion about the product, and we shoot it ourselves, so we understand the frustration when your shots don't turn out. Like I said, please don't hesitate to contact us if you're having film trouble at service@theimpossibleproject.com for Europe, usa@theimpossibleproject.com for the US and asia@theimpossibleproject.com for Asia.

  5. #35
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImpossibleUSA View Post
    If anyone has had issue with the film that is not user error, you can of course contact us directly and we can troubleshoot and offer replacement film as necessary. Regardless of knowing what the formula is for Polaroid film, most of the chemical components Polaroid used are either no longer available or are banned by current environmental laws. Impossible film is comprised of entirely new chemistry and, outward appearances aside, is made from about 90% new materials in general. It took Polaroid 17 years to refine their integral film. Impossible has made huge strides in 2 years, considering it is from a whole new chemistry. Consider it like someone saying, "Make a cake that looks like a cake and tastes like a cake and feels like a cake, but you can't use any of the ingredients that are in cake."

    You cannot think of Impossible film as Polaroid film. As a result of Polaroid's decision to pull the plug, Polaroid film is long gone. Impossible is the ONLY company making film for Polaroid cameras now. You have to unlearn everything you know about Polaroid film. This is not Polaroid film. So Photo Engineer's statement, "You should not have to be "taught" how to use a commercial product that has antecedents" just doesn't apply at all. Impossible film doesn't have antecedents.

    All of us at Impossible have a passion about the product, and we shoot it ourselves, so we understand the frustration when your shots don't turn out. Like I said, please don't hesitate to contact us if you're having film trouble at service@theimpossibleproject.com for Europe, usa@theimpossibleproject.com for the US and asia@theimpossibleproject.com for Asia.
    Well put.

    I remember the first Polaroid images I saw I'd guess in the 1960's and there were still big teething problems. (similar to some reported today).

    The problem here on APUG is some people climb onto their shaky high horse and try to dictate what happened in the past and what the futire may bring as if their word is Gospel.

    Kodak learnt through it's mistakes, although more recently they ignored them, Polaroid improved their products dramatically over the years, hopefully the Impossible Project will as well.

    Ian

  6. #36
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    TIP;

    I can both agree and disagree with your statement.

    I don't have to be "taught" how to use Ilford MGIV paper once I have used a similar product. I don't have to be "taught" how to use Fuji Crystal Archive paper after using Kodak Endura. They use totally different chemistry BTW in these two color products. And, I should not have to be cautioned to shade your instant product when it stands alone as the only instant product that needs such protection.

    When 2 naphthyl amine was determined to be a serious carcinogen, many substitutes were found by organic chemists. That is the nature of organic and inorganic chemistry. I have done that very thing many times either to avoid prior art or to avoid bans on certain chemicals.

    Remember that I am making Azo and Kodabromide type papers in my home darkroom and using benign chemicals. I do not use the toxic ones such as Cadmium and Mercury salts. I use work around chemistry.

    There is more than one way to skin a cat.

    PE

  7. #37
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImpossibleUSA View Post
    If anyone has had issue with the film that is not user error, you can of course contact us directly and we can troubleshoot and offer replacement film as necessary. Regardless of knowing what the formula is for Polaroid film, most of the chemical components Polaroid used are either no longer available or are banned by current environmental laws. Impossible film is comprised of entirely new chemistry and, outward appearances aside, is made from about 90% new materials in general. It took Polaroid 17 years to refine their integral film. Impossible has made huge strides in 2 years, considering it is from a whole new chemistry. Consider it like someone saying, "Make a cake that looks like a cake and tastes like a cake and feels like a cake, but you can't use any of the ingredients that are in cake."

    You cannot think of Impossible film as Polaroid film. As a result of Polaroid's decision to pull the plug, Polaroid film is long gone. Impossible is the ONLY company making film for Polaroid cameras now. You have to unlearn everything you know about Polaroid film. This is not Polaroid film. So Photo Engineer's statement, "You should not have to be "taught" how to use a commercial product that has antecedents" just doesn't apply at all. Impossible film doesn't have antecedents.

    All of us at Impossible have a passion about the product, and we shoot it ourselves, so we understand the frustration when your shots don't turn out. Like I said, please don't hesitate to contact us if you're having film trouble at service@theimpossibleproject.com for Europe, usa@theimpossibleproject.com for the US and asia@theimpossibleproject.com for Asia.
    Well put.

    I remember the first Polaroid images I saw I'd guess in the 1960's and there were still big teething problems. (similar to some reported today).

    The problem here on APUG is some people climb onto their shaky high horse and try to dictate what happened in the past and what the future may bring as if their word is Gospel.

    Kodak learnt through it's mistakes, although more recently they ignored them, Polaroid improved their products dramatically over the years, hopefully the Impossible Project will as well.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 04-30-2012 at 05:39 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: correct typo

  8. #38

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    The problem I have at the moment with it is the cost.
    If I buy locally I'm up for $5 a shot and I don't have a huge budget.
    I will be buying some shortly though because I now have a folding SX-70 that I'm itching to try...

  9. #39

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    It's good to see you having a presence here; there are a lot of members who will be interested in your input. It is great to have people working so hard to keep these older processes alive.

    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by ImpossibleUSA View Post
    If anyone has had issue with the film that is not user error, you can of course contact us directly and we can troubleshoot and offer replacement film as necessary. Regardless of knowing what the formula is for Polaroid film, most of the chemical components Polaroid used are either no longer available or are banned by current environmental laws. Impossible film is comprised of entirely new chemistry and, outward appearances aside, is made from about 90% new materials in general. It took Polaroid 17 years to refine their integral film. Impossible has made huge strides in 2 years, considering it is from a whole new chemistry. Consider it like someone saying, "Make a cake that looks like a cake and tastes like a cake and feels like a cake, but you can't use any of the ingredients that are in cake."

    You cannot think of Impossible film as Polaroid film. As a result of Polaroid's decision to pull the plug, Polaroid film is long gone. Impossible is the ONLY company making film for Polaroid cameras now. You have to unlearn everything you know about Polaroid film. This is not Polaroid film. So Photo Engineer's statement, "You should not have to be "taught" how to use a commercial product that has antecedents" just doesn't apply at all. Impossible film doesn't have antecedents.

    All of us at Impossible have a passion about the product, and we shoot it ourselves, so we understand the frustration when your shots don't turn out. Like I said, please don't hesitate to contact us if you're having film trouble at service@theimpossibleproject.com for Europe, usa@theimpossibleproject.com for the US and asia@theimpossibleproject.com for Asia.

  10. #40
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    Real bummer about the 4x5 production. I know lots of 4x5 shooters (including myself) that have 545 backs but no films, while Fuji expects one to pay 200 for a new back when they could have just have easily made their film compatible. Blah!
    K.S. Klain

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