Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,930   Posts: 1,585,367   Online: 1008
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35

Thread: New 110 Camera

  1. #21
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    494
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    What you need then is a simple plastic lens that will mount on a good quality camera. Lots of the large format folks are using simple plastic meniscus lenses with really interesting results. Shouldn't be too hard to cobble something together inside the gutted barrel of and old lens.
    Good idea, Roger. Actually, I've done some meniscus lens photography on LF, using glass lenses or adapted multi-element lenses like binocular objectives and such, using mainly paper negatives. Lots of fun.

    But the appeal to me of these small plastic Lomo cameras is their simplicity, cost and use of multi-exposure rollfilm, for uses like street and documentary photography. Think a film version of Instagram or similar iPhone-style camera app. There are some interesting newer Lomo cameras on the market, like the La Sardina line, metal bodied that look like old sardine cans, with a collapsible lens, and come in various decor. Would make a nice carry-around street shooter with fast film. But once again, exposure control is very limited. You'd think Lomo should come out with an accessory pack of ND filters for all of these cameras. After all, selling accessory goo-gaas and film is part of their branding strategy. Hmm, maybe I should contact them about that idea.

    ~Joe

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mission Viejo, California
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,490
    Brownie 127 gave darned nice pictures. Those cameras served a generation or two of American families (and other markets as well).

    The main limitation was fixed focus, shutter speed and aperture that meant most people used them only in daylight or with flash bulbs.

    Many of the models had glass lenses.

    You can find old 127 Brownie photos posted on Flickr and see that the results were not crappy, like Lomo, at all.
    - Bill Lynch

  3. #23
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,212
    Well if you could adapt a simple lens to something like 6x9 folder with a better shutter and a diaphragm that might be nearly ideal. Small and easy to carry, good build quality, adjustable exposure, funky lens results.

  4. #24
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,212
    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    Brownie 127 gave darned nice pictures. Those cameras served a generation or two of American families (and other markets as well).

    The main limitation was fixed focus, shutter speed and aperture that meant most people used them only in daylight or with flash bulbs.

    Many of the models had glass lenses.

    You can find old 127 Brownie photos posted on Flickr and see that the results were not crappy, like Lomo, at all.
    Agree. My mother has an old 127 Brownie with which I shot the first film I ever developed.

    The lens is rather soft, but it's not like a plastic Holga or the like.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    751
    Wait, how did this go from 110 to 127?
    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

  6. #26
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,212
    Thread creep.

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,953
    Images
    60
    The 127 Ektachrome super slides I shot on my first camera, a Brownie Starmite, projected really well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mission Viejo, California
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,490
    It's exciting that there are new 110 films available now!
    - Bill Lynch

  9. #29
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    You're confusing 127 with 110. VERY different things. 127 is basically roll film like 120 only slightly smaller, about 4 cm across, thus the 4x4cm "baby" Rolleis. Far larger negatives than 35mm and capable of fine results with modern films if the camera is. 110 is a sub-miniature format with the sizes you list.
    You are right, I wrote 127 and I meant 110. I was surprises those new 110 rolls were pre-flashed with frame boundaries. I actually would be surprised just the same for any format.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    751
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    You are right, I wrote 127 and I meant 110. I was surprises those new 110 rolls were pre-flashed with frame boundaries. I actually would be surprised just the same for any format.
    All 110 film, even the old rolls, were pre-flashed. I believe it has to do with the cheap meniscus lenses in most 110 cameras. Since the lenses were low-quality, you had a distinct loss of sharpness in the corners; so much that people in tests complained. Instead of using better quality lenses, Kodak put frame boundaries in in order to prevent photofinishers from using the softer edges of the image.
    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin