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  1. #11
    AgX
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    There are basically two types of flash-bars.

    The one you need (and got in that photo) is called Flip-Flash or Top-Flash. It is the vertical type. From this type again there are basically two (interchangable) versions. You got the more advanced type.

  2. #12

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    The text doesn't mention anything about how you get the diffrent shutter speeds, but "deux vitesses (1/60 et 1/150)" means "two speeds (1/60 AND 1/150)" literally.

    Another thought, look in the film compartment for something that can be triggered by a notch on the 110 cassette. Maybe faster film triggered the 1/150?

    edit: In the manual for the Kodak Pocket instamatic 10 they mention that you can insert a used magicube to trigger a slower shutter speed in dull sunlight. That model had no settings but obviously two speeds.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cl3mens View Post
    The text doesn't mention anything about how you get the diffrent shutter speeds, but "deux vitesses (1/60 et 1/150)" means "two speeds (1/60 AND 1/150)" literally.

    Another thought, look in the film compartment for something that can be triggered by a notch on the 110 cassette. Maybe faster film triggered the 1/150?

    edit: In the manual for the Kodak Pocket instamatic 10 they mention that you can insert a used magicube to trigger a slower shutter speed in dull sunlight. That model had no settings but obviously two speeds.
    Good info, I guess that settles it I'll have to keep around a used/bar just in case I want a slower shutter speed...
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #14
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    There are basically two types of flash-bars.

    The one you need (and got in that photo) is called Flip-Flash or Top-Flash. It is the vertical type. From this type again there are basically two (interchangable) versions. You got the more advanced type.
    I'm not sure of the difference between the regular and advanced type, I seem to have two types altogether there are the ones by GE that's General Electric, they each have four flashes on each side of the flip flash, their simple to use and I remember using them as a kid so it's not confusing to me at all, and then I have one of another version that has five on each side instead and it's called a "super 10" made by Sylvania, I know it may be a waste but I tested a bulb in each of them and they both work just fine, I'm not really sure of the other type that you're speaking about as you didn't tell me anything about them, but it's good to know that I have the right kind.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #15
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    I found a flash adapter on ebay for my best friend, I'm sure they are out of production. It plugs in where a flash-bar goes, and has an hot shoe. It clamps on a regular 110 camera. Your camera is larger so kids could handle it easily, so the adapter will not be able to make contact in the flash-bar receptacle. The reason is, the socket for the flash bar is in a recessed area. Normally, the top of the camera would be completely flush.

    You can make an extension from an old flash-bar (you'll have to find a socket) so the flash adapter will work.
    My best friend's camera really just is a shell around a regular 110 camera. If yours is similar, you could also take the "shell" off to reveal the pocket-sized camera, and the adapter should clamp on just fine.
    Also, there are some adapters that have the flash-bar plug on a wire - one of those may work. I've one that has a connector with flash bar on one side, and flash cube on the other. I got this to use on a couple 126 cameras I am resurrecting.

    You might enjoy this video about testing flash bulbs:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm8m0fh8nIo

    Fairview Photo, in my area, will process 110 (although they are annoyed by it). I'm pretty sure they do mail-order:
    http://www.fairviewphoto.net/
    Funny video haha!

    I do see what you mean about they top of the camera not being completely flush, it is flush on one side but not on the other so it depends on how the adapter is designed I suppose.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Pardon the dust...

    I have looked everywhere on the Internet and couldn't find a single image of an adapter so if you could come up with the name of the adapter perhaps maybe that would be easier for me to find one.

    It would be extremely amazing if I could find an adapter that had a hot shoe or even just a PC terminal and then I could add a hot shoe after, that would make a lot more creative things happen as I could simply adjust the flash exposure levels in order to make something really interesting. Heck I could even connected to my studio strobes with a pocket wizard and do some really fun things with that.

    But right now I'm just working on getting some film before the holidays it seems as though the stores that used to sell the Lomography film, no longer do (Urban Outfitters) and only sell the Fuji Instax and the Impossible Project Polaroid film...

    Blah...

    Though the sales guy when I called him didn't seem to really know anything at all about cameras, and kept calling it a phone... Haha, and then said that some of the films they have had squiggly lines on them as a design and that was "fun" haha
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #16
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I'm not sure of the difference between the regular and advanced type, I seem to have two types altogether there are the ones by GE that's General Electric, they each have four flashes on each side of the flip flash, their simple to use and I remember using them as a kid so it's not confusing to me at all, and then I have one of another version that has five on each side instead and it's called a "super 10" made by Sylvania, I know it may be a waste but I tested a bulb in each of them and they both work just fine, I'm not really sure of the other type that you're speaking about as you didn't tell me anything about them, but it's good to know that I have the right kind.
    GE made a model that let you chose how many bulbs to let go off at one time.
    This is unique in flash-bar photography.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    GE made a model that let you chose how many bulbs to let go off at one time.
    This is unique in flash-bar photography.
    Oh I see, well I think I have that type actually, because when I flashed the flash to flashes went off at the same time, eek! I seem to have two different models, one has ... oh heck I'll just show you....

    Click image for larger version. 

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    As you can see the contact points are different, one only has one side, while the other has both sides or something like that. The name on the flashes doesn't seem to change between the two different types, but obviously the contact points must of different in some way... They are both labeled "Flip Flash II"
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #18
    AgX
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    There was Flip-Flash I and Flip-Flash II, with #I being the classic one.

    Thank you for that contacts-photo.

  9. #19
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    There are no adjustment to be made on that camera.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    There are no adjustment to be made on that camera.
    I know that, but to expose more accurately just in case I wanted to be more artistic with it, it's good to know what the functions of the camera and shutter speed are so that I can test for the best lighting situations.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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