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  1. #21
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    There are basically two types of flash-bars.

    The one you need (and got in that photo) is called Flip-Flash or Top-Flash. It is the vertical type. From this type again there are basically two (interchangable) versions. You got the more advanced type.
    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    GE made a model that let you chose how many bulbs to let go off at one time.
    This is unique in flash-bar photography.
    I mixed up those flash-bars...

    It is the Philips Topflash that offers the unique feature of deliberately firing several bulbs the same time.


    The difference between the GE Flip-Flash I and II is the different location of the bulbs within the bar: square vs. row.
    But more importand: the prisms array on front of each bulb at the #II with white reflectors behind them.
    Last edited by AgX; 12-23-2013 at 06:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
    AgX
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    There are so many variations even in the flash-bulb world, one discovers something new all the time. As those different contacts.

  3. #23
    Truzi's Avatar
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    The notches were started (I think) on 126 film cartridges. I used to have a link for 110 notches, but cannot find it. Here is the best I can come up with at the moment, just to give you an idea:
    http://retinarescue.com/110cassette.html
    Of course, you can't forget wikipedia (and perhaps go to camerapedia):
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/110_film

    I've heard the presence of a flash did change the shutter speed even on the most basic models, but I've not confirmed this.

    Finding info on the flash adapter has been difficult. When I got home from work I dug out mine - its an Acme-lite 138. Something like this would probably work on your 110, but is a dedicated flash, not an hotshoe adapter. Here is an old ebay listing (it is sold). I have one for my 126 cameras:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI...ectorid=229466

    I think the unit I got my best friend is similar to this National PW-110 adapter - it is an hotshoe. The one on this page appears to be for flash cubes, while hers is for flash bars, so the model number may be different. As you can see, a plastic "clip" ratchets to clamp it on the camera. On your (and her) camera, since the top is not flush, it will not reach the slot. Also, the clip would have to be modified if the camera stays as-is. I intend to fabricate an extension for her that will plug into the camera socket, and the flash adapter will plug into the extension.
    http://www.minimalvideo.com/mt/mt-se...IncludeBlogs=2

    Basically, I will use an old flip-flash for the plug, and probably get an old extender to cannibalize for it's socket (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Kodak-flipfl...-/280616374332) - to make my own extension.
    Truzi

  4. #24
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    The notches were started (I think) on 126 film cartridges.
    Yes, then followed by the Agfa Rapid (to conquer 126) and then the Kodak Super-8 and then Fuji Single-8 cassettes.

  5. #25
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Stone,

    You can look on Ebay for the occasional 110 Verichrome Pan 12 exp roll... There's a couple there now.

    While some later-generation 110 cameras could tell the film speed from notches, the first generation were naturally set to ASA 100. The Model 20 that I started out with had two speeds, slow speed enabled by using a flash. I used to keep matchsticks in my pocket to take advantage of this fact on cloudy/overcast days.

    (So, it IS an adjustable camera).

  6. #26

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    I've heard some pretty nasty things about the first gen. Kodacolor 400 in 35 mm. Prints from the 110 version must look like mud. I'd love to see examples from it when it was fresh.

    If I ever get around to building some sort of device for perforating film for 110 I'd definitly load up some Superia 1600 and go for it.

  7. #27
    Truzi's Avatar
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    This thread reminds me that I loaded a couple 126 cartridges with unperfed (& hand punched) 35mm. I've been waiting for a sunny day, but now remember the flash adapter I have. My Grandmother's Minolta has a bit of a problem firing the flash at times (probably why she stopped using it). I'm going to test it out now, and maybe take some flash pictures with it this week.

    cl3m3ns, you can get a tiny punch and make a little jig. I've not gotten around to mine yet. For 126, I went to an art store and found a punch about the right size, and used a couple pieces of balsa wood as a guide. It's a pain, but works. You might find this thread interesting:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...35mm-film.html

    For 110, the index hole is between the frames. So long as you space them correctly, and put them the right distance from the edge of the film, it should be fine. It may waste more film if the punch is too big, but it should work.
    Also, test the camera you intend to use. My best friend's 110 cocks the shutter after two "winds." I held the indexing pin in, and it still fired the shutter - so perfs may not be necessary (they are on my Grandmother's Minolta, though).
    Truzi

  8. #28
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by cl3mens View Post
    I've heard some pretty nasty things about the first gen. Kodacolor 400 in 35 mm. Prints from the 110 version must look like mud. I'd love to see examples from it when it was fresh.
    Kodacolor 400 type 110 was a modified conversion, by this taking care for the special needs of that format.

  9. #29
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    While it is heavy on the Pentax 110, scroll to the bottom and there is info on the speed setting tab.
    http://cameraquest.com/pentx110.htm
    I enjoy my 110 cameras with Lomography Orca B&W and Color Tiger. I, being a good AUPG'r, process the B&W myself. It's a pretty nice film with a real speed of 100. The Color Tiger is 200, and also does very well. I tried some Lobster red scale and found it interesting. Made an 11X14 print and was surprised how good it looked. People don't believe it was done with 110.
    While I do most of my work with 35mm and 6X7, I sure have fun with 110 and my Minox.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak, of all people, did!
    .


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    While it is heavy on the Pentax 110, scroll to the bottom and there is info on the speed setting tab.
    http://cameraquest.com/pentx110.htm
    I enjoy my 110 cameras with Lomography Orca B&W and Color Tiger. I, being a good AUPG'r, process the B&W myself. It's a pretty nice film with a real speed of 100. The Color Tiger is 200, and also does very well. I tried some Lobster red scale and found it interesting. Made an 11X14 print and was surprised how good it looked. People don't believe it was done with 110.
    While I do most of my work with 35mm and 6X7, I sure have fun with 110 and my Minox.
    Thanks for the info that's great to hear, question your 11 x 14 print was that optically printed or scanning the negative and then printing that separately?

    I know that lomography had a black-and-white film at least one, and I know they also make a C-41 version that is also black and white I believe, as well as the color ones, and the red scale which is just the film with the emulsion side in instead of out I believe...

    I was hoping to find a 400 speed black-and-white film if possible, anyone know who sells that, new?

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