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  1. #1

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    Image transfers with Fuji instant films?

    Hey guys and gals,

    Since Polaroid is no longer going to produce their instant films, I was wondering if some of you have experimented with the Fuji instant films. It just so happens that I began gaining some interest in image transfers (not emulsion lifts) after Polaroids announcement!

    I'm not planning on using the Daylab copy equipment. I just plan on making an exposure with my Land camera, let it develop for 15-25 seconds, and then smacking down the emulsion on a piece of water color paper.

    Has anyone tried with with the Fuji instant films? How were you results? Any tips for a noobie? Thanks!

    Jason

  2. #2
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    Works. Look here:

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/polaroi...7603906450061/

    Long post, scroll down to find it.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Good link. So the key bits seem to be--

    Transfer to dry paper.

    Peel in the dark (a very small amount of light for positioning the neg is okay), but the lights can come on once the neg is on the receptor sheet.

    Roll hard with a brayer for 30-60 sec. before peeling.

    He describes using a small night light at the other end of the room for positioning the neg, but I'd probably experiment a bit with the various safelights I have to see if one works better than others.

    As I recall, I tried it a couple of times and indeed, all I got was a green blob of not much, because I peeled in the light.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  4. #4
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    As I recall, I tried it a couple of times and indeed, all I got was a green blob of not much, because I peeled in the light.
    Maybe that's the key. It's counterintuitive based upon working with Polaroid transfers.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  5. #5
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    Any acid content in the paper will slow down any transfer. The paper should be either neutral or alkaline. Also, aluminum sizing agents will stop the transfer cold. This is true of Polaroid or Fuji products.

    PE

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Can you translate into English please

    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Roll hard with a brayer for 30-60 sec. before peeling.
    What's a "brayer"

    Ian

  7. #7
    keithwms's Avatar
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    A brayer is just a roller. Any crafts store has one for you. It's like a rolling pin with a smooth but firm rubber surface.

    I never got good image transfers with the Fuji stuff. Even when I did it in the dark, with or without warmth or moisture. Maybe I didn't brayer it firmly enough. I did easily get remarkably (to me) sturdy emulsion transfers by simply boiling the print. I mean, you can really tug on and deform the fp100c emulsion and dry it and glue it down. Fun for the whole family.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #8

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    You know David, that was the same result I was getting. I never thought to try Fuji Instant in the dark. Sounds weird, but I am interested in giving it a try. I have recently read about boiling Fuji Instant prints, though I have not tried it yet.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat Photography

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That's what we called them in elementary school.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  10. #10
    ann
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    what did you use to glue the lifts down? and, did the "glue" show?

    i found the film lifted easily but wouldn't stick to anything.
    Last edited by ann; 02-23-2008 at 03:14 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: addition question
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

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