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  1. #11
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    IIRC, Kodak did put their 400CN films in APS cartridges for a while, so you could get b/w images from an APS camera. The problem with the format was, as previously mentioned, it was so late to market that it was essentially stillborn. If they had gotten it out the door four or five years earlier, it could have had a viable life, but by the time it came along, digital was reaching the consumer/prosumer market.

    As to APS SLRs, Nikon and Minolta both marketed interchangeable lens SLRs for APS - the Nikon Pronea and the Minolta Vectis. Pricetags and funky names combined with limited utility and strange ergonomics/cosmetics did them in. The Minolta looked kinda like a rangefinder but without any rangefinder windows on the front, and the Nikon, well, just the name sounded like an eye disease. Plus the fact that they never came out with a model (much rumored) that would take Nikon F-mount lenses. The fact that whichever system you went with required their own unique lens mounts with a new, specialized set of lenses doomed the APS SLRs.
    Last edited by TheFlyingCamera; 03-30-2009 at 12:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
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    Scott;

    I have a Pronea and can exchange lenses with my Nikon 2020 just fine except for the focal length differences between APS and 35mm sizes. Also, some regular lenses block the mirror movement in the APS camera due to focal length.

    APS was designed, as I said before, to be "compatible" with digital by having the same image size on-sensor or on-film. It also had the three standard film/video formats available and the capability of recording more information per frame than any existing digital format, but this was never realized.

    The films had a light sensitive stripe for recording data at exposure time and also a magentic stripe to record data after the fact. There was even a model for talking pictures using a tiny soundtrack. None of this was fully utilized.

    PE

  3. #13
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Well, I guess I'm just confused then. Maybe I confused the Pronea with the Vectis ( which I KNOW did not have a standard Minolta mount), or the Pronea wide-angles were not backwards compatible to the F-mount cameras. Whatever. I think we sold all of two Pronea cameras and maybe a half-dozen Vectis SLRs in the four years I worked at the store. Yes, the capabilities of the system were vastly underutilized.

  4. #14
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    IIRC, Kodak did put their 400CN films in APS cartridges for a while, so you could get b/w images from an APS camera. The problem with the format was, as previously mentioned, it was so late to market that it was essentially stillborn. If they had gotten it out the door four or five years earlier, it could have had a viable life, but by the time it came along, digital was reaching the consumer/prosumer market.

    As to APS SLRs, Nikon and Minolta both marketed interchangeable lens SLRs for APS - the Nikon Pronea and the Minolta Vectis. Pricetags and funky names combined with limited utility and strange ergonomics/cosmetics did them in. The Minolta looked kinda like a rangefinder but without any rangefinder windows on the front, and the Nikon, well, just the name sounded like an eye disease. Plus the fact that they never came out with a model (much rumored) that would take Nikon F-mount lenses. The fact that whichever system you went with required their own unique lens mounts with a new, specialized set of lenses doomed the APS SLRs.
    The Canon APS SLR took regular EF lenses for sure. Not sure about the other brands.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    You can buy scanner attachments to scan APS negatives.

    It doesn't make room for professional photographers to process themselves easily or print easily.

  6. #16
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    They are easy to print. I use a small screwdriver to open the APS cannister and then roll out the film. I use a 35mm roll holder with a paper mask to hold the APS film in my enlarger and then I make prints from it easily.

    PE

  7. #17
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning;

    In the camera arsenal is one Minolta Vectis 40 "Date" APS format camera. It is a fairly nice P&S camera with a fairly wide range zoom lens. Quite a capable "normal people" camera. I am getting a bit concerned about its weight, though. It is getting quite thin with the increasing inability to find something to feed it.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    but as far as I know, there was never a B&W film, and only one slide film available (and that had to mailed to Europe for processing which didn't excite the US market).
    All I have ever seen as far as APS film is cheapo consumer-grade C41 film. This in and of itself was enough of a deterrance for me. And I am sure others felt the same about it.

  9. #19
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    Matt;

    My APS film was simply marked with a speed and the Kodak logo, there was no specific film type associated with it so it would be rather impossible from that informaiton to know the formulation used such as Portra or Gold for example. Actually, a separate formula was used due to the smaller format.

    PE

  10. #20
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    I have an Elph 2 that I bought at a thrift store for $1. It works perfectly, and is a neat little camera. I only wish I could get black-and-white APS film, since I have no color darkroom capabilities. Developing is no problem, many minilabs can do it, but I don't know about scanning. Perhaps just laying it on the glass would work, but I have never tried.

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