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  1. #11

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    I had a Pen EES which took nice half frame pictures, although I ended up converting the exposure mechanism for more manual control.

    My biggest disappointment was that it tool half frame pictures in a portrait orientation with the top and bottom of the picture next to the perforations. What I really wanted was a camera that would naturally take pictures in the old "filmstrip" format that all us old timers remember from our K-12 education days. This requires a picture with the sides of the image next to the perforations The Pen could do this but you had to hold the camera in a vertical orientation all the time which I found unnatural. The Pen looked like any other rangefinder camera with horizontal film travel. Because almost all filmstrip projectors have a vertical film travel they need the pictures to be positioned in a horizontal orientation. The following blast from the past describes the "filmstrip" format and its relationship to the half frame cameras.

    http://contrails.iit.edu/DigitalColl...RLTR65-078.pdf

    Denis K

  2. #12

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    yeah, i can see why it would be nice to have it make half frames landscape orientation ..
    but then you wouldn't get the extra 24 or 36 frames! and it would be like an aps camera .
    it has taken me about a year to get used to shooting with the camera sideways, but i don't mind
    anymore

    the ee's i always thought were odd birds with the strange exposure mechanism.
    there was someone here on apug a few years back ( maybe 1 ? ) who recorded
    his tale of woe, as he tried to get it to work .. maybe it was just his that didn't work right ...


    thanks bill!

    john

  3. #13
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    I had both a Canon Demi and a Canon Dial 35 (basically a Demi with spring motor drive.) They had auto exposure with manual override; zone focusing. Cut a pretty sharp image. I used them for snap shooting on vacation because the company for which I worked in photo retail gave us a certain number of rolls of free processing. I loaded the Canons up with 36x rolls of C-41, got about eighty prints a roll. Hee, hee. Always lusted after the Ollie Pen F, but could never afford one.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #14

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    That might have been me. The Pen EES has an auto exposure mode that makes use of two shutter times depending on the light level. On my camera the slower shutter setting didn't work and this prevented me from taking pictures in low light levels. I ended up opening the camera and making a number of modification to disable the slower shutter setting. I could then use the camera in a manual aperture, fixed shutter time mode. I also had to clean out an accumulation of white powder that got between the two lens groups. The white powder came from some form of deterioration inside the camera and got between the lens groups thru a slit where the aperture stops mechanism enters. As I remember the deterioration came from the material used in the light sensor.

    When I was trying out the camera I used color print film and had it processed at a mini-lab. I got them to give me proofs printed two half-frames to each 4x6. I remember thinking it made a neat note-taking camera because you could get like 72 frames per roll. At first I liked the portrait orientation but later I ended up wanting a filmstrip orientation. The camera cost me zilch and it was a fun experiment. I vaguely remember when the half-frame craze went thru the camera world but I wasn't into photography back then.

    Denis K

  5. #15

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    I have an Agfa Optima-Parat and the Agfa Paramat. The Optima-Parat has an accurate selenium meter and a very sharp Solinar (Tessar-type lens). It offers trap-needle programmed autoexposure. there also is an add-on telephoto lens and a close-up lens, as well. Construction is mostly metal.

    The Paramat features a mostly plastic body, a Apotar lens (triplet) and also trap-needle autoexposure with a selenium meter.

    I also have an Olympus Pen FT (interchangeable-lens SLR system) and a couple of Pen viewfinder cameras (both of those need to be repaired).

    I use the Optima-Parat a lot. It's small and well made with an excellent lens.

  6. #16
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    A friend of mine has an old Mercury that was his fathers. I don't know that they are the most reliable machine, but he sure took some beautiful photos with his.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  7. #17
    bdilgard's Avatar
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    If you can find one the Fuji TW-3 is very compact and looks like (and basically is) a point and shoot. It winds to the end and works forward so the order of your pictures is backwards. I like using the Yashica Samarai's but compact they are not. They look like a 1980's era camcorder.
    Turning negative into positive since 1975

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis K View Post
    I had a Pen EES which took nice half frame pictures, although I ended up converting the exposure mechanism for more manual control.

    My biggest disappointment was that it tool half frame pictures in a portrait orientation with the top and bottom of the picture next to the perforations. What I really wanted was a camera that would naturally take pictures in the old "filmstrip" format that all us old timers remember from our K-12 education days. This requires a picture with the sides of the image next to the perforations The Pen could do this but you had to hold the camera in a vertical orientation all the time which I found unnatural. The Pen looked like any other rangefinder camera with horizontal film travel. Because almost all filmstrip projectors have a vertical film travel they need the pictures to be positioned in a horizontal orientation. The following blast from the past describes the "filmstrip" format and its relationship to the half frame cameras.

    http://contrails.iit.edu/DigitalColl...RLTR65-078.pdf

    Denis K
    Denis, there is a camera that has the frame oriented for the horizontal. The film travels vertically in the camera. It's called the Samurai x4.0. I picked one up several months ago, and it appears to do everything mentioned in it's specifications. It's also an SLR, but sadly the Samurai is not a compact camera.

    http://www.thecamerasite.net/02_Rang.../yasamurai.htm

    Of all the half-frame cameras I've had, the Olympus Pen FT is still my favorite in that format.

    :rolleyes:
    Last edited by DannL; 08-03-2009 at 12:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  9. #19
    Romary's Avatar
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  10. #20

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    DannL, that's a really neat camera. I never knew it existed. It's surprising how late it was introduced (1988). You are right, since the film travel is vertical, the half frame image is naturally oriented as a horizontal 4 wide by 3 high image. That is just what's needed for a "filmstrip" projector. Some might say that holding the camera isn't much different than holding a Pen EES vertically, but it looks much more natural to me. It even has a 25-100mm zoom lens. There is a pdf manual for the camera here: http://www.thecamerasite.net/web/Samurai4.0.pdf

    I saw your Samurai thread on APUG back in May. I also noticed there is a neat half-frame group on flikr. It would be fun to play around with one of these. If I had Samurai, I would go out and produce an educational filmstrip just to say I have done one. I think I would skip the 33 1/3 RPM record that usually went with them. Maybe someone could be the first person to ever produce a half-frame filmstrip with an accompanying MP3 soundtrack complete with the beep sounds to tell you when to go to the next image.

    Denis K

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